benefits for including sustainability | My Assignment Tutor

Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 1 of 20WILLIAM ANGLISSINSTITUTESubject Delivery ScheduleHOS603Sustainable Procurement for Hospitality and Tourism Semester:1Year:2021Co-ordinator:Kristin Lemura Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 2 of 20 Subject Co-ordinator & LecturerKristin LemuraLocation (Office)A333 / Working remotely.Emailkristin.lemura@angliss.edu.auConsultation TimesBy appointmentSubject TutorPaul DennisLocation (Office)A336Emailpaul.dennis@angliss.edu.auConsultation TimesBy appointment Delivery mode: OnlinePrimary Delivery site: Melbourne campusDelivery details: ActivityGroupRoomDayTimeLectureALLOnlineFriday8.00am – 10.00amTutorial1OnlineFriday12.00pm – 2.00pmTutorial2OnlineFriday2.00pm – 4.00pm Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 3 of 20Subject Summary This subject will introduce the general principles of procurement and the benefits for including sustainability inprocurement decisions. Students will explore the procurement management cycle, approaches to supply chainmanagement and the complexities of different distribution models. The subject examines the social, environmental,ethical and economic implications of procurement decision making processes. Students will study the alignment ofbusiness strategy with the values of sustainable procurement and corporate social responsibility. Intended Learning OutcomesAfter successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:Intended Learning Outcome (ILO)AssessmentTask1Explain the principles and concepts of the procurement cycle1,32Examine the relationship between business strategy and procurement decisions2,33Evaluate supplier, products and services selection in relation to sustainable business practicesand considerations1,24Analyse the social, environmental, ethical and economic implications of procurement decisionson the organisation and the supply chain2,35Identify opportunities to introduce sustainable practices within the procurement cycle2,3 Graduate AttributesGraduate AttributeLevel of inclusionAssessment task1preparednessexa1-32aethical and social understandingt/f2,32bsustainability literacyt/f23systematic and coherent body of knowledgeexa1-34a(cognitive) analyse, critique, consolidatet/f24b(cognitive) synthesise, independencen/a5scholarly skillsimpl6ainterpersonal skillsn/a6bteamwork skillsn/a7a(communication) written, oral, numericalt/f1-37b(communication) multimedia, technicalimplA further commitment:opportunity to explore and develop personal attributes (list)Problem solving skills Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 4 of 20Student workload No. of timetabled hours/weekNo. of personal studyhours/weekTotal workload hours/week4610 Assessment Summary and Due Dates Assessment TaskWordCountWhenAssessedWeighting1Test: Procurement Cycle1 hourWeek 420%2Literature Foundation research review: AnnotatedBibliography1,000Week 620%3Strategic purchasing report: Part AOrganisational research. Definitions and context1,300Week 820%Strategic purchasing report: Part BSupplier evaluation and analysis of purchase decisionconsequences. Recommendations2,400Week 1240% Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the Faculty Assessment Regulations.These can be found on the MyWAI portal under Higher Education announcements or use the linkbelow:Faculty Assessment RegulationsFaculty Exam Regulations Threshold Learning OutcomesThis is the minimum threshold standards that are expected of all tourism, hospitality or eventsgraduates4Problem Solving41-35Professional and Civic Responsibility42,3 Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 5 of 20 Assessment 1:In-class testAssessment Type:TestWeighting:20%Word Limit:One (1) HourDue date:Week (4) four – In tutorialsPlease note: test will start 15 minutes after class commencementtime. We will not wait if you are late. Details:Students will sit an in-class test on procurement principles and concepts in week four.Test will be based on topics from the first 4 weeks of lectures and the first 3 weeks of tutorials ofsemester.If you know you cannot make this time, please come and see me WELL BEFORE the test day (atleast 48 hours).If you miss this test a doctor’s certificate is required within a 24-hour time frame of the testcommencement. If you miss this time you must then apply for special consideration.Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 6 of 20 Assessment 2.1:Literature Review – Foundation research reviewAssessment Type:Annotated BibliographyWeighting:20%Word Limit:1,000 words (+/- 20%)Due date:Week 6 – Sunday 4th April @ 11.59pm Task:Select, summarise and evaluate key articles relevant to Assessment 3 – Strategic PurchasingReport.Key articles (6 in total) must include a minimum of;• four (4) high quality academic journal articles,• one (1) professional industry website AND• one (1) professional industry report or book chapter• each article must analyse a different topic sourced from Assessment 3 –Major Research Report requirements (i.e. procurement, CSR, SCM).Each article should be analysed in approximately 150 – 200 words, outlining the relevance of thearticle in relation to the final report. Students should follow the appropriate annotation structure andAPA referencing format.Your annotated bibliographies should follow the structure:1. Topic area – so that the examiner can clearly identify your topic and how it potentiallyrelates to the report2. Citation – In APA format, correctly referenced3. Introduction4. Aims (and where relevant, *research methodologies)5. Scope (what does the research or the website include)6. Usefulness (to the topic that you have highlighted above)7. *Limitations (where relevant – word count dependant)8. Conclusions9. Reflections (explain how you will use this in your research)10. Separate Reference List, in alphabetical order, at the bottom of your 6 annotations.* Word count dependant.Students should also read the marking criteria in detail to ensure that all aspects of theassessment are being responded to.Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 7 of 20 CATEGORYCRITERIA AND MARK ALLOCATION –Annotated BibliographyFailPassCreditDistinctionHigh DistinctionBasic Conditions ofAssessmentPass / FailFail = 0Basic conditions of assignment arenot met – assessment failed(Word count 20%, Originalityscore is above 20% and/or match/s6% to any one source). Review ofpaper highlighted plagiarism oracademic integrity issues.Word count within 20% of set limit(excluding reference list)Originality score equal to or lessthan 20% and no plagiarismissues detected.Originality match/s equal to orbelow 6% to any one source andno plagiarism issues detected.Credibility,relevance andarticle variety20%No relevant or credible references(i.e. Wikipedia, Dictionaries) used.Articles analysed the same orsimilar topics. Less than requiredarticles missing either four (3) highquality academic journal articles,and/or no professional industrywebsite and/or no professionalindustry report or book chapterUses some relevant and credibleresearch. Most articles analyseddifferent topics relevant to finalreport (some articles analysedsimilar topics)four (4) quality academic journalarticles,one (1) professional industrywebsite ANDone (1) professional industryreport or book chapterUses mostly relevant andcredible research. Articlesanalysed different topics relevantto final reportfour (4) high quality academicjournal articles,one (1) professional industrywebsite ANDone (1) professional industryreport or book chapterHigh relevance and credibleresearch. Articles analyseddifferent topics relevant to finalreportfour (4) high quality academicjournal articles,one (1) professional industrywebsite ANDone (1) professional industryreport or book chapterALL highly relevant and credibleresearch. Articles analyseddifferent topics relevant to bothsections of the final reportfour (4) high quality academicjournal articles,one (1) professional industrywebsite ANDone (1) professional industryreport or book chapterReferencing10%Unacceptable level of referencingerrors or omissions. No separatereference list. 5 or less articlesannotatedBetween 8 – 10 referencing errorsand / or omissionsReference list included not inalphabetical orderBetween 4 – 7 referencing errorsand / or omissions. Referencelist included in alphabetical orderBetween 2 – 3 minor referencingerrors and / or omissions.Reference list included inalphabetical orderNo referencing errors, otherwise,correctly referenced. Referencelist included in alphabetical orderStructure /Annotation60%Summary of the majority of articlesis very poor / inadequate.Numbered guide not followed.The purpose / main idea/s / findingsnot identified in the majority ofarticlesUsefulness and reflections wereeither poor, not correctly identified,or missing in the majority of articles.Numbered guide followed. Fewsummaries meet the lengthrequirements.Few annotations adequatelydescribe the source material.Annotations offer little insight intousage of purpose / main idea/s /findings / information.Usefulness and reflections forarticles were vague and/or unclearin the majority of articles.Numbered guide followed. Somearticle summaries were too shortor too long.Annotations adequately describethe source material, but lackinsight into usage of purpose /main idea/s / findings /information.Usefulness and reflections forarticles were clear but lackedspecifics in the majority ofarticles.Numbered guide followed. Themajority of articles were clearlyand concisely summarised.The purpose / main idea/s /findings were identified in themajority of articles. Usefulnessand reflections for articles wereclearly identified in the majorityof articles.Numbered guide followed. Eacharticle was clearly and conciselysummarised.Purpose / main idea/s / findingswere identified clearly in allarticles. Usefulness andreflections for all were clearlyidentified.MechanicsEnglish grammar,spelling, punctuation,and capitalization10%Frequent and distracting errors inEnglish grammar, punctuation,spelling, and capitalization,significantly detract from the clarityof the ideas presented and / orobscure meaning.Errors in English grammar,punctuation, spelling, andcapitalization, are present anddetract from the clarity of some ofthe ideas presented; however,generally the use of English issufficiently adequate for themeaning to remain clear.Medium level of errors in Englishgrammar, punctuation, spelling,and capitalization; however,errors do not extensively detractfrom the clarity of the analysisdiscussion.Low number of errors in Englishgrammar, punctuation, spelling,and capitalization; errors do notimpact flow or detract from theclarity of the analysis discussionEnglish grammar, punctuation,spelling, and capitalization arecorrect.No errors / minimal errors that donot detract from the clarity of theanalysis discussion. Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 8 of 20 Assessment 3:Strategic Purchasing Report (due in two parts) Introductory Statement:A topic as complex as sustainability within supply chains and procurement decisions associatedwithin the hospitality industry requires a detailed and extensively researched report. Using the venuecase study provided, students are to compile a business report to assist the client in improving theirunderstanding of sustainable procurement terminology within a hospitality context.This information, along with the analysis and recommendations will provide context for anysustainable procurement decisions the owners and staff may have to make both now and in thefuture.There are two parts to this report. Strategic purchasing report: Part A – 1300 words – DUE Week 8Organisational research. Definitions and contextStrategic purchasing report: Part B – 2400 words – DUE Week 12Supplier evaluation and analysis of purchase decision consequences. Recommendations A case study of a fictitious restaurant has been created online for you to examine. You are towrite your report to the owners of the business found on this fictitious website.The link to this site can be found via the Moodle page under the Assessment ‘tab’. You mustaccess this site from the Moodle tab. A report will be generated from Moodle to ensure allstudents have accessed this link.To help you write this report templates have been provided for you. You will find templatesfor Part A & B over the next few pages.Report conventions –https://mywai.angliss.edu.au/images/Mywai/higher_education/he_documents/Higher_Education_Glossary_V1.pdfpg 14http://libguides.angliss.edu.au/researchskillstips/reportsWriting longer formal reports helpful guide – letter of transmittal not requiredFaculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 9 of 20 Assessment 3.1Part AWeighting:20%Word Limit:1,300 wordsDue date:Week 8 – Sunday 2nd May @ 11.59pm When writing a report in industry, there is a need to introduce and define key concepts and set thecontext for the investigative report. This section of the report will offer the reader an overview (andoutline) of the key areas that the report will cover in a general manner.In a report format, please complete the following:• Title page – addressed directly to the client• Executive Summary (Leave blank for Part A – Complete in Part B)• Table of Contents – not counted in word count1. Introduction (roughly 200 words);1.1. Organisational background1.2. Purpose of the report1.3. Limitations2. Definitions (roughly 800 words);2.1. The Difference – Procurement and sustainable procurement (explain why these termsmay be considered different from each other)2.2. Transparency – Explain what is meant by transparency in supply chain management. (Itmay help here if you actually choose a case study to show where there may be issues in thesupply chain i.e. at the origin there may be unfair labour practices, unsafe workenvironments, environmental hazards etc.). Compose a list that a business may use to helpthem minimise the risks a business may find in their supply chain (i.e. how will a businessbe able to buy things to be able to minimise its impact on people and the environment. Howdo they weigh up who the best supplier is? What qualities do they need to possess?)2.3. Triple Bottom Line – Explain what is meant by the term triple bottom line. How does thisapply within a hospitality setting and what does each area address?Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 10 of 202.4. Commodities (roughly 300 words MINIMUM) – Introduce and define the commoditybeef so that the venue has a good understanding of the farming/manufacturing processesinvolved. Please present this information in table format. (This is to set the tone for theanalysis section of the report)2.4.1. Complete the following table for the commodity of beef (At least 3 options)Students should read the marking criteria in detail to ensure that all aspects of the assessment arebeing responded to. In this column make a list ofthe different types of beefproduced (an e.g. has beenprovided for you)Summarise (in YOUR OWNWORDS) what the ‘type’ or‘farming method means.Note any other aspect thatis specifically unique to thatcommodityAssess overallpositive ornegativei.e. Grass fed or pasture fedTo be classified as grass fed,cows need to have spent theirentire life grazing pastures.Grazing is beneficial torestoring ecosystembalance and is part of theregenerative agriculturemovement (Npr.org, 2021)Positive Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 11 of 20 CATEGORYCRITERIA AND MARK ALLOCATION – ASSESSMENT 3.1 – Report – PART AUnsatisfactoryPassCreditDistinctionHigh DistinctionBasic Conditionsof AssessmentFail/PassBasic conditions of assignmentare not met. Word count 20%, Originality score is above20% and/or match/s 6% to anyone source. Review of paperhighlighted plagiarism oracademic integrity issues.Word count within 20% of setlimit (excluding reference list).Originality score equal to or lessthan 20% and no plagiarismissues detected. Originalitymatch/s equal to or below 6% toany one source and noplagiarism issues detected.OrganisationalIntroduction10%Introduction does not contain aclear purpose for the report.Details concerning the frameworkfor the report are not included.Context analysis is unclear in thatit does not use prescribed casestudy. No attempt at describingmethodologyLimitations not identified and/ornot relevantContains a clear purposestatement setting out thedifferent aspects to be coveredby the report. Context analysis isadequate but refers mostly toobvious relationships betweenthe implementation of the theoryissue and the workplace. Someattempt to outline methods andsources of information/data tobe used.Limitations broadly identifiedand mostly relevant.Clearly sets the framework forthe report. Contains wellexpressed purpose statement,differentiates between thedifferent topics that will becovered. Distinguishes betweenthe areas to be covered in thereport. Context analysis showsunderstanding of the issues inrelation to the case study.Methods and sources ofdata/information to be used areclearly outlined.Limitations broadly identifiedand relevantClearly and concisely sets theframework for the report.Clearly distinguishes betweenthe areas that will be coveredand the issue under investigationand the process used. Contextanalysis is clear anddemonstrates deepunderstanding of the relationshipbetween the workplace and theresearch topic.Limitations identified andrelevantComprehensively andthoroughly sets the frameworkfor the report Highly detailedunderstanding of the businesscase studyA well-structured purposeleading the reader with littletopic knowledge with a clearunderstanding of the detail ofthe investigation to be coveredin the rest of the report. Methodsand sources of data/informationto be used are clearly outlinedLimitations specificallyidentified and highly relevantKey terms andconcepts50%No substantial knowledge and/orunderstanding of topicsdemonstrated. Poor or noapplication of theory applied.Little or no detail givenAdequate/Basic knowledgeand/or understanding of topics.Basic level of analysis andsynthesis of ideas and concepts.Some relevant theory applied;Minimal detail givenSolid knowledge and/orunderstanding of topics. Goodlevel of analysis and synthesis ofideas and concepts. Good use ofapplied relevant theory; Goodlevel of detail given.Substantial knowledge and/orunderstanding of topicsdemonstrated. Very good levelof analysis and synthesis ofideas and concepts. Very gooduse of applied relevant theory.Comprehensive and thoroughunderstanding of topicsdemonstrated. Excellent level ofanalysis and synthesis of ideasand concepts. Excellent use ofapplied relevant theory;Excellent level of detail given Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 12 of 20 CommodityTerminology20%No substantial knowledge and/orunderstanding of the topicdemonstrated. Poor or noapplication of theory applied.Little or no detail given. Thecommodity group has not beenincluded in the report, or thedefinition is lacking in depth, or,not relevant to the procurementfunction.Adequate/Basic knowledgeand/or understanding of thetopic. Basic level of analysis andsynthesis of ideas and concepts.Some relevant theory applied;Minimal detail given. Thecommodity groups have bothbeen broadly identified, but aregeneral in nature and aremissing key relevantinformation including supplychain, procurement or TBLconsiderationsSolid knowledge and/orunderstanding of the topicdemonstrated. Good level ofanalysis and synthesis of ideasand concepts. Good use ofapplied relevant theory; Goodlevel of detail given. Bothcommodity groups have beenincluded, but the informationfails to address some key supplychain, procurement or TBLconsiderations or is broad innature.Substantial knowledge and/orunderstanding of the topic. Verygood level of analysis andsynthesis of ideas and concepts.Very good use of appliedrelevant theory. Bothcommodity groups have beenincluded, and informationaddresses key supply chain,procurement and TBLconsiderations.Comprehensive and thoroughknowledge and/or understandingof the topic. Excellent level ofanalysis and synthesis of ideasand concepts. Excellent use ofapplied relevant theory;Excellent level of detail given.The commodity group has beenwell explained includes keysupply chain, procurement andTBL considerations with allrelevant key areas such asproduction, farming, distributionand consumptions key termsaddressedReferencing10%Less than 10 references providedReliance on web references (nonacademic)Minimal or missing reference listOver reliance of one referenceUnacceptable level of referencingerrorsIntext referencing and/or referencelist missingBasic use of references, basicvariety of relevant (includingacademic) references sourced.Mostly correctly referenced withsome errors, minimum 10references applied within thereport.Reference list provided, mostly inalphabetical order with someerrorsGood use of references, goodvariety of relevant (includingacademic) references sourced,correctly referenced with minorerrors, 11 or more referencesappropriately applied within thereport.Reference list provided, listed inalphabetical order with minorerrorsVery Good use of references,wide variety of relevant(including academic) referencessourced,correctly referenced with minimalerrors, 12 or more referencesappropriately applied within thereport.Reference list provided, listed inalphabetical order with minimalerrorsExcellent use of references, widevariety of relevant (includingacademic) references sourced,correctly referenced with noerrors, 15 or more referencesappropriately applied within thereport.Reference list provided, listed inalphabetical order with no errorsBusiness ReportRequirements,includingOrganisation &Mechanics10%Report does not include majorityof the report requirements set outby this rubric. Many elementsmissing from report including;•Executive Summary Section•Table of Contents•Correct Headings used•Page numbers•Poor organisation of ideas,illogical organisation•Poor use of grammar andspellingReport includes most of thereport requirements. Someelements missing.•Executive Summary Section•Table of Contents Listed•Correct Headings used•Page numbers•Basic use of grammar andspelling•Basic organisation of ideas,coherent and logical structureReport fulfils most of reportrequirements•Executive Summary Section•Table of Contents Listed•Correct Headings used•Page numbers supplied•Introduction and conclusionprovided•Correct use of grammar andspelling•Good organisation of ideas,coherent and logical structureReport fulfils majority of reportrequirements•Executive Summary section•Table of Contents Listed•Correct Headings used•Page numbers supplied•Introduction and conclusionprovided•Correct use of grammar andspelling•Very Good organisation ofideas, coherent and logicalstructureReport fulfils all requirements:•Executive Summary section•Table of Contents Listed•Correct Headings used•Page numbers supplied•Introduction and conclusionprovided•Excellent use of grammar andspelling•Excellent organisation of ideas,coherent and logical structure Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 13 of 20 Assessment 3.2Report Part BWeighting:40%Word Limit:2,400 wordsDue date:Week 12 – Sunday 30th May @ 11.59pm Building on the first section of the business report, students must now analyse, evaluate and offerrecommendations.Students must continue writing their report from Part A.Task Details:Part B – Analysis and recommendations (2,400 words)1. Executive Summary – to be completed (between ½ – 1 page)2. Table of contents – to be updated and completed from Part A3. Part A of report – to be updated (where appropriate) from Part A examiners feedback3. Analysis – comment on the relationship between business strategy and the importance of theprocurement function.3.1. Triple bottom line implications on the supply chain (external) – using the table you haveconstructed above discuss in detail the commodities you have discussed within the table. Ensure youdiscuss both the positives and negatives of each item listed. (Economic, environmental, social and/orethical concerns must be raised here). Most importantly remember to explain why you assessed it asoverall positive or negative. Out of all the options listed tell the owners which commodity productionoptions would you, as the sustainable procurement consultant recommend?)3.2. Strategic Direction – Outline what direction should the business take? (Proposed business name /Vision and Mission statement with justification) What are the advantages of putting TBL into thebusiness strategy? What are the consequences the business could face if they ignore aspects of thesupply chain?3.3. Explain why it is important for businesses to include corporate social responsibility in theirbusiness strategy. (In order to answer this you must first explain what CSR actually is, then youneed to explain why you need to include these ideas when the business is purchasing something)(Hint: social, environment and economic implications). Include a proposal for a new missionstatement and CSR policy for the business.3.4. Tactical Purchasing3.4.1.Provide procedures regarding how to choose suppliers for the business owners to follow3.4.2.Create and provide a purchase specification template that can be utilised for ordering4. Best Practice Recommendations – find examples of best practice in sustainable procurement. Identifyopportunities to introduce a minimum of three (3) other sustainable supply chain or procurementmanagement initiatives. Don’t forget to address all aspects of the TBL in these recommendations.5. ConclusionFaculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 14 of 20It is expected that you will complete your own independent research.You are still required to use APA referencing system, as per every other assessment you have completed forthis subject.Students should read the marking criteria in detail to ensure that all aspect of the assessment is beingresponded to.Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 15 of 20 CATEGORYCRITERIA AND MARK ALLOCATION – ASSESSMENT 3.2 – Final ReportFailPassCreditDistinctionHigh DistinctionBasic Conditionsof AssessmentFail/PassBasic conditions of assignmentare not met. Word count 20%,Originality score is above 20%and/or match/s 6% to any onesource. Review of paperhighlighted plagiarism oracademic integrity issues.Word count within 20% of set limit(excluding reference list).Originality score equal to or lessthan 20% and no plagiarism issuesdetected. Originality match/s equalto or below 6% to any one sourceand no plagiarism issues detected.Executive Summary5%The following are not covered:the report’s purpose, analysis,conclusions and/orrecommendations. Importantinformation is omitted. Nodistinction between the differentoutcomes with which the reportdeals.Generally clear but limiteddefinitions/summaries of thereport’s purpose, analysis,conclusions and/orrecommendations. May lack clarityin defining the reports staring pointand direction.Clearly defines/summarises thereport’s purpose, report’s purpose,analysis, conclusions andrecommendations. Providesnecessary information for a clearstarting point and direction of thereport. .Clearly and conciselydefines/summarises the report’spurpose, analysis, conclusionsand/or recommendations. Includesall relevant details to provide aclear starting point and direction ofthe report.Comprehensive and thoroughlysummarises all important aspects of thereport. Gives a clear review of all thenecessary aspects of the report leavingthe reader motivated to read the fullreport.TBL Implications(external)10%The TBL implications of thecommodity group is inadequate ormissing from the analysisThe TBL and ethical implicationson the supply chain have beenidentified, however lack depth anddetail, or fail to be specific to thebusiness strategy.The TBL and ethical implicationson the supply chain have beenexplored and offer insight for thebusiness strategy.The TBL and ethical implicationson the supply chain have beenexplored and offer detailed insight(and evidence of wider reading) forthe business strategy.Comprehensively and thoroughlyanalyses the TBL and ethicalimplications on the supply chain Offersdetailed insight (and evidence of widerreading) for the business strategyStrategic Direction10%Potential strategic direction hasnot been identified or is notspecificPotential strategic direction for theorganisation has been identified,however lack depth and detail, orfail to be specific for the businessPotential strategic direction for theorganisation has been explored andoffer insight into specificprocurement practices for thebusinessPotential strategic direction for theorganisation has been explored andoffers insight (and evidence ofwider reading) into the businessstrategy.Comprehensively and thoroughlyanalyses strategic direction on theorganisation offering insight (andevidence of wider reading) into thebusiness strategy.CSR & Mission/Vision Statement10%No substantial knowledge and/orunderstanding of CSRdemonstrated. The proposedname, mission and /or visionstatement is missing, incompleteor inappropriate to theorganisationBasic knowledge and/orunderstanding of CSR. Theproposed name, mission and /orvision statement has been included,however lacks detail, or fails toaddress some key areas suitable tothe information provided in thecase study Solid knowledge and/orunderstanding of CSR. Theproposed name, mission and /orvision statement reflects a clearpicture of the organisational valuesand offers a solid foundation forthe report recommendations andpolicies and procedures.Substantial knowledge and/orunderstanding of CSRdemonstrated. The proposed name,mission and /or vision statementreflects a clear picture of theorganisational values and offers asubstantial foundation for thereport recommendations andpolicies and procedures.Comprehensive and thoroughunderstanding of CSR demonstrated Theproposed name, mission and /or visionstatement reflects a clear picture of theorganisational values and offers athorough and comprehensive foundationfor the report recommendations andpolicies and procedures. Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 16 of 20 CSR Policy10%The CSR Policy is missing,incomplete or inappropriate to theorganisationThe CSR policy has been included,however lacks detail, or fails toaddress some key areas suitable tothe information provided in thecase studyThe CSR policy reflects a clearpicture of the organisational values,and offers a solid foundation forthe report’s recommendations andpolicies and proceduresThe CSR policy reflects a clearpicture of the organisational values,and offers a substantial foundationfor the report’s recommendationsand policies and proceduresThe CSR policy reflects a clear picture ofthe organisational values, and offers athorough and comprehensive foundationfor the report’s recommendations andpolicies and proceduresSupplier SelectionCriteria andPurchaseSpecifications15%The supplier selection criteria iseither incomplete, missing, orpoorly executed.The purchase specifications areeither incomplete, missing orpoorly executedThe supplier selection criteria isincluded, but is missing importantinformation or is not entirely inline with the organisational missionstatement or CSR policy.The purchase specifications areincluded but are missing importantinformation or are not entirely inline with the organisational missionstatement or CSR policy.The supplier selection criteria isincluded, but is either missingsome important information or isnot entirely in line with theorganisational mission statement orCSR policy.The purchase specifications areincluded solid information but arenot entirely in line with theorganisational mission statement orCSR policy.The supplier selection criteria isincluded, substantially outliningthe process. It is also in alignmentwith the organisational values andmission statement.The purchase specifications areincluded and are substantial indetail and align with theorganisational strategy, values,mission statement and CSR policy.The supplier selection criteria iscomprehensively and thoroughlycommunicated and is in alignment withthe organisational values and missionstatement.The purchase specifications arecomprehensively and thoroughlydemonstrated and communicated and arein alignment with the organisationalstrategy including its values, missionstatement and CSR policy.Best PracticeRecommendations15%Recommendations are eithermissing, not suitable, orinappropriate to the businessneeds, or are not related to thesupply chain or procurementmanagement.The recommendations do notaddress the TBL whereappropriateThe analysis andrecommendations are not linkedto the introductory section.The recommendations included areappropriate and reflect anunderstanding of the businessneeds and service element,however they are not based frombest practice and (may) fail toaddress a more suitable or practicalrecommendation.The analysis and recommendationsare linked to the introductorysection, but the link is either weakor vagueAll recommendations are identifiedusing best practice examples. Therecommendations identifieddemonstrate an understanding ofthe business needs and theprocurement function. Therecommendations offered aresupported and include details ofsuitable policy and proceduralchanges where necessary.The analysis and recommendationsare mostly linked to theintroductory sectionAll recommendations andchallenges identified are insightfuland well formulated from bestpractice examples. Therecommendations identifiedsubstantially demonstrate clearlyan understanding of the businessneeds and the procurementfunction.The analysis and recommendationsare clearly linked to theintroductory section.All recommendations and challengesidentified are insightful and wellformulated from best practice examples.The recommendations comprehensivelyand thoroughly demonstrate clearly anunderstanding of the business needs andthe procurement function. Therecommendations offered are supportedand include specific and practical policyand procedural changes as well asimplementation recommendations as perthe business strategyThe analysis and recommendations areclearly linked to the introductory section.Referencing10%Less than 4 references providedComplete reliance on webreferences (non-academic)Over reliance of one referenceUnacceptable level of referencingerrorsIntext referencing and/orreference list missingBasic use of references, basicvariety of relevant (includingacademic) references sourced.Mostly correctly referenced withsome errors, at least 10 referencesappropriately applied within thereport. Reference list provided,listed in alphabetical order withsome errorsGood use of references, goodvariety of relevant (includingacademic) references sourced,correctly referenced with minorerrors, 11 or more referencesappropriately applied within thereport. Reference list provided,listed in alphabetical order withminor errorsVery Good use of references, widevariety of relevant (includingacademic) references sourced,correctly referenced with minimalerrors, 12 or more referencesappropriately applied within thereport. Reference list provided,listed in alphabetical order withminimal errorsExcellent use of references, wide varietyof relevant (including academic)references sourced,correctly referenced with no errors, 15 ormore references appropriately appliedwithin the report. Reference listprovided, listed in alphabetical orderwith no errors Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 17 of 20 Business ReportRequirements,includingOrganisation,Presentation andPart A modification& Mechanics15%Many elements missing fromreport including; ExecutiveSummary Section, Table ofContents, Correct Headings used,page numbers, Poor organisationof ideas, illogical organisation.Frequent and distracting errors inEnglish grammar, punctuation,spelling, and capitalization,significantly detract from theclarity of the ideas presented and /or obscure meaning. Lacksorganization of ideas/paragraphstructures. Headings ornumbering system are incorrect.There is no logical order to theplacement of the sections. Whereappropriate Part A feedback wasnot actioned.Some elements missing.Executive Summary Section, Tableof Contents, Correct Headingsused, page numbers Basicorganisation of ideas, coherentand logical structure.Some inconsistencies in headingsand numbering system, howeverthere is a logical order of sectionsand of ideas/discussion points.There is some attempt at consistentspacing and paragraphing andacceptable spelling andgrammatical errors. Whereappropriate Part A feedback wasactionedReport fulfils most of reportrequirements Executive SummarySection, Table of Contents, CorrectHeadings used, page numbersGood organisation of ideas,coherent and logical structure.Contents table is well set out anddenotes the structure of the report.A consistent heading andnumbering system is usedthroughout with minimal errors. Amostly well considered, cohesiveand logical organisation of sectionsand ideas/discussion points.Spacing and paragraphing iscorrectly formatted and minimalspelling and grammatical errors.Where appropriate Part A feedbackwas actioned, and this made a solidcontribution to the overall reportReport fulfils majority of reportrequirements Executive SummarySection, Table of Contents, CorrectHeadings used, page numbers VeryGood organisation of ideas,coherent and logical structure. Aconsistent heading and numberingsystem used throughout. Skilfulpresentation. A mostly wellconsidered, cohesive and logicalorganization of sections andideas/discussion points. Spacingand paragraphing is correctlyformatted and practically nospelling and grammatical errors.Where appropriate Part A feedbacknot actioned, and this made asubstantial contribution to theoverall reportReport fulfils all requirements: ExecutiveSummary Section, Table of Contents,Correct Headings used, page numbersExcellent organisation of ideas, coherentand logical structure. Contents tableindicates considerable thought given tothe structure of the paper and is correct inall areas. Where appropriate Part Afeedback not actioned, and this made asolid contribution to the overall report Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 18 of 20Topic and Readings Schedule by Week WeekLectureTutorialReadings1Introduction to;BasicProcurementBasic SustainableProcurementThe ProcurementProcessStakeholdersBaily, P (2015). Chapter 1 ‘Procurement scope anddevelopment’, Procurement, Principles and Management.(11th ed.). Harlow: Pearson Education Limited.– Standards Australia Limited. (2017). Sustainableprocurement – guidance. NSW: Standards AustraliaLimited2Introduction to;Supply ChainSupply ChainManagementSupply Chain MappingXu, X., & Gursoy, D. (2015). A Conceptual Framework ofSustainable Hospitality Supply Chain Management.Journal of Hospitality Marketing & Management, 24(3),229–259. https://doi.org/10.1080/19368623.2014.909691James Musgrave, & Sean Beer. (2011). A critical reviewof “green” procurement: Life cycle analysis of foodproducts within the supply chain. Worldwide Hospitalityand Tourism Themes, (3), 229.https://doi.org/10.1108/175542111111421943Strategic ProcurementOrganisation Policiesand ProceduresWheel of MisfortuneAcademic IntegrityGameBaily, P. (2015). Chapter 2 – ‘Strategic procurement andsupply chain management’, Procurement Principles andManagement (11 ed.) Harlow, United Kingdom: PearsonEducation LimitedMelissen, F., & Sauer, L. (2019). ‘Chapter 6 – Yourbusiness model and competencies’, ImprovingSustainability in the Hospitality Industry4Student revision timeAssessment 1 – Test(held in Tutorials)5EnvironmentalImplicationsEnvironmentalImplications activityChapter 8 – ‘Agriculture and food sourcing’, Sustainabilityin the Hospitality Industry: Principles of sustainableoperations 3rd edJones, P. and Comfort, D. (2020), “The COVID-19 crisisand sustainability in the hospitality industry”, InternationalJournal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, Vol. 32No. 10, pp. 3037-3050. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCHM-04-2020-03576** Due to week 6’s lecturefalling on the publicholiday, lecture will bepre-recorded andreleased on Thursday 1stApril.**Historical contexts andfuture directions of foodproductionSocial and EthicalImplicationsAssessment 2 –Annotated BibliographyDue Sunday @ 11.59pmNo tutorials due topublic holiday.Zizka, L. (2017). The (mis)use of social media tocommunicate CSR in hospitality: Increasing stakeholders’(dis)engagement through social media, Journal ofHospitality and Tourism Technology, Vol 8 No. 1. pp73-86. https://doi.org/10.1108?JHTT-07-2016-0037Carrigan, M., Lazell, J., Bosangit, C. & Magrizos,S., (2017). Burgers for tourists who give a damn! Drivingdisruptive social change upstream and downstream in thetourist food supply chain, Journal of SustainableTourism, 25:11, 1563-1582, DOI: 10.1080/09669582.2017.1291652 Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 19 of 20 Semester Break7Corporate SocialResponsibilityCSR Policy ResearchChapter 5 ‘An Extended Framework For UnderstandingCorporate Social Responsibility: Strategic Implications InRestaurant Settings’, Sustainability, Social Responsibilityand Innovations in the Hospitality Industry–Chapter 12 – ‘Corporate social responsibility and socialentrepreneurship’, Sustainability in the HospitalityIndustry: Principles of sustainable operations 3rd edThe Process of Responsibility, Decoupling Point, andDisengagement of Moral and Social Responsibility inSupply Chains: Empirical Findings and PrescriptiveThoughts. (2016). Journal of Business Ethics, (2), 281.https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-014-2429-8Jones, P., Hillier, D. and Comfort, D. (2016),“Sustainability in the hospitality industry: Some personalreflections on corporate challenges and researchagendas”, International Journal of ContemporaryHospitality Management, Vol. 28 No. 1, pp. 36-67. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCHM-11-2014-0572 8Product SpecificationsAssessment 3 Part ADue Sunday @ 11.59pmProduct SpecificationActivityAND Par stockCalculation activityChapter 8 ‘The Purchase Specification: An overall view’,Purchasing: Selection and Procurement for the HospitalityIndustry9Supplier SelectionCriteriaSupplier SelectionCriteriaChapter 12 ‘The Optimal Supplier’, Purchasing: Selectionand Procurement for the Hospitality Industry10Inventory ManagementStorage & Security– Purchase Factor– EP Costing– Storage Floorplan– Chapter 12 & 13‘Typical storage management procedures’ & ‘Security inthe purchasing function’, Purchasing: Selection andProcurement for the Hospitality Industry11Inventory ManagementIssuing & Usage– Menu Design – RecipeCosting– Report WorkshopChapter 10 ‘The Optimal Price’, Purchasing: Selectionand Procurement for the Hospitality IndustryGoh, E. & Jie, F., (2019). To waste or not to waste:Exploring motivational factors of Generation Z hospitalityemployees towards food wastage in the hospitalityindustry, International Journal of Hospitality Management,Volume 80, pp 126-135, ISSN 0278-4319,https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhm.2019.02.00512Report InformationSessionsAssessment 3 Part BDue Sunday @ 11.59pmReport WorkshopChapter 15 – ‘Certification processes and ecolabels’,Sustainability in the Hospitality Industry: Principles ofsustainable operations 3rd edNoteThere are several readings that you can be sourced directly from MyWai. Go to the respective weeks for links to this content. Faculty of Higher EducationHOS603-Sem1-2021 Prepared by: Kristin Lemura©William Angliss Institute Page 20 of 20References / Readings:Baldwin, C., Wilberforce, N., & Kapur, A. (2011). Restaurant and food service life cycle assessment and developmentof a sustainability standard. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 16(1), 40-49.Dani, S. (2015). Food Supply Chain Management and Logistics: From Farm to Fork. United Kingdom: Kogan Page.Baily, P., Farmer, D., Crocker, B., Jessop, D., & Jones, D. (2015). Procurement, Principles and Management. (11thed.). Harlow: Pearson Education Limited.Feinstein, A.,& Stefanelli, J.M. (2012). Purchasing: selection and procurement for the Hospitality industry. (8th ed).Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.Hammond, S. T., Brown, J. H., Burger, J. R., Flanagan, T. P., Fristoe, T. S., Mercado-Silva, N., . . . Okie, J. G. (2015).Food Spoilage, Storage, and Transport: Implications for a Sustainable Future. BioScience, 65(8), 758-768.doi:10.1093/biosci/biv08Legrand, W., Sloan, P., & Chen, J. S. (2017). Sustainability in the hospitality industry: principles of sustainableoperations. Routledge: LondonMeehan, J., & Bryde, D. (2011). Sustainable procurement practice. Business Strategy and the Environment, 20(2), 94-106.Melissen, F., & Sauer, L. (2019). Improving sustainability in the hospitality industry. Routledge, Taylor & FrancisGroup.Parsa, H. G., & Narapareddy, V. (2015). Sustainability, Social Responsibility, and Innovations in Tourism andHospitality. Oakville, Apple Academic Press.Sonnino, R., & McWilliam, S. (2011). Food waste, catering practices and public procurement: A case study of hospitalfood systems in Wales. Food Policy, 36(6), 823-829.Standards Australia Limited. (2017). Sustainable procurement – guidance. NSW: Standards Australia LimitedTate, W. (2013). The Definitive Guide to Supply Management and Procurement: Principles and Strategies forEstablishing Efficient, Effective, and Sustainable Supply Management Operations. Upper Sasddle River N.J.:Pearson Education.Wang, Y. F., Chen, S. P., Lee, Y. C., & Tsai, C. T. S. (2013). Developing green management standards forrestaurants: An application of green supply chain management. International Journal of HospitalityManagement, (34), 263-273.Wognum, P. N., Bremmers, H., Trienekens, J. H., van der Vorst, J. G., & Bloemhof, J. M. (2011). Systems forsustainability and transparency of food supply chains–Current status and challenges. Advanced EngineeringInformatics, 25(1), 65-76. service quality. Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Administration Quarterly, 48(1), 59-69.

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