Digital Video Post Production | My Assignment Tutor

MODULE BOOKLET Module Title Digital Video Post Production Module Code SM6053 Session 2020/21 Semester Autumn London Metropolitan University (Revised version October 2020) Details of Staff Module Leader: Sally Mould Email: [email protected] Module level Honours (H) Teaching location North campus Teaching semester Autumn semester To view the time, date and location of class see your personal timetable available at https://student.londonmet.ac.uk/timetable Credit rating for module 15 credits Prerequisites and co-requisites Pass SM5003 Digital Sound and Video or have equivalent skills ESSENTIAL – EXTERNAL HARD DRIVES As this is a video course, you will be generating files that will be too large to save locally. To successfully complete this course, you will need to invest in an external hard drive. Obviously you can use could storage e.g. Google Drive or Dropbox, but you need to allow extra time for this at the end or beginning of sessions. Module Summary This module will examine and analyse traditional and modern visual special effects using examples from film, music video, television and games to illustrate the development of new techniques from old. Practical exercises, lectures, and demonstrations will aid students in developing a wide spectrum of technical and analytical skills in the field of digital post-production and visual special effects. Students will be expected to undertake all stages of the creative planning process to deliver an integrated digital video and audio project in order to complete the module. Module aims • Develop and encourage confidence in the integration of appropriate motion graphics software • Examine the emotional effects of visual special effects on audiences and contemporary culture • Illustrate how new digital imaging techniques have built upon traditional methods • Analyse the most effective approach to a variety of visual effects problems Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module students will be able to: Critically analyse technological developments and the cultural effects of digital special effects (LO1)Apply a range of digital special effects to digital video and evaluate a wide range of technical issues involved in the delivery of visual effects for different media forms (LO2) Outline of syllabus An indicative programme of study covers the following: The history of visual special effects in cinema from analogue to digitalDigital special effects and cultureAudience perceptionPractical digital imaging and animation techniques for output to digital video using appropriate motion graphics softwareThe production process involved in creating a complete special effects sequenceDigital distribution techniquesOverview of the industry and industry rolesThe future of digital special effects in this rapidly expanding field Learning and Teaching This module will be delivered through a combination of modes of delivery. Each week there will be a two-hour lab session and a one-hour lecture or seminar these sessions will consist of screenings, demonstrations of production techniques and their application. There will be a weekly discussion from week 2 on ideas and thoughts for the effects sequence. Each person will be expected to take part in discussing ideas. In addition, support to individuals and smaller groups will be provided through tutorial sessions and via email. Lecture notes and web links will be made available on WebLearn. Online discussion forums will also be made available and students will be encouraged to participate. A framework that encourages mutual student support will be developed to support project work. Attendance at all sessions is essential to fulfil the work requirements. Organisation of Study Time: There are 150 study hours allocated to this module. The following table gives indicative guidance on how students will be expected to spend this allocation of time. Scheduled learning and teaching activities:45Lectures & discussions Workshops in labs Visits to exhibitions, galleries and facilities and talks from industry professionals Individual and group tutorialsGuided independent study:105Preparation for weekly class using online resources Using software & tutorials to develop design & production skills Design & production for Assignment 1 Design & production for Assignment 2Total Learning Hours for the module:150 Outline of lectures Please note that you will find further reading and learning materials on the WebLearn site. Although this contains a general outline, some details will change Study Programme The Study Programme may be amended during term time WEEK ONE Lecture: Introduction and overview of course Workshop: Intro to After Effects WEEK TWO Lecture: A brief history of special effects Workshop: Animation techniques and importing graphics from Photoshop WEEK THREE Lecture: Animation – techniques and critical theory Workshop: Character animation techniques WEEK FOUR Formative Assessment – sequence analysis: A short comparison of SFX used in two contrasting sequences Workshop: Animation techniques – Build your own character WEEK FIVE Lecture: Immediacy, Hypermediacy, Remediation and Remix Workshop: Time effects WEEK SIX Lecture: Title sequences and design for expectations Workshop: Animating typography using the text tool WEEK SEVEN Lecture: Music videos and the use of special effects for narratives Workshop: Masks and Alphas, Chroma keys WEEK EIGHT Lecture: Creating political messages – the power of symbols and graphics Workshop The Paint tool WEEK NINE Lecture: Creating visual support material for your proposal Workshop: Producing graphics and effects – The shape tool WEEK TEN Assignment 1 support and feedback – individual tutorialsWorkshop: Track MattesDeadline: Hand in Essay on Monday of week 11 WEEK ELEVEN Lecture: Understanding target audiences and distribution.Producing a digital sequence – techniques and technology Workshop: 3D in After Effects and cameras Workshop: Audio in AE, Work on projects WEEK TWELVE Lecture: Summary of key issues in producing a special effects sequence/feedback on first assessment Workshop: Syncing sound to graphics WEEKS THRTEEN – FIFTEENWeeks 13, 14 and 15 will be study weeks to complete assignment 2DEADLINEDigital Video Effects Project hand on Monday of week 16. For Reading list see Weblearn 4. Attendance and Absence Student engagement is an important part of completing a module successfully. The university has in place a clear engagement monitoring system which is explained in Section 3 of the Student Engagement Policy. You are expected to attend all teaching and learning activities for this module,as well as engage with all aspects of teaching and learning. If you are not able to attend a tuition session for a specific reason, you should request an authorised absence by emailing your course leader in advance of the session. Your course leader will review your request and let you know whether it has been approved. You may have no more than three authorised absences per module per semester. If your attendance and/or your overall engagement becomes a cause for concern you will be contacted by the School Office who will discuss this with you, including the option to take a break. If you do not engage with the School Offices at this point your studies may be terminated. 5. Academic Integrity and Plagiarism Academic integrity requires honesty in your studies. You should not present another person’s sentences or ideas as your own work. You should clearly identify quotations through the use of quotation marks and references to the sources. Failure to adhere to these academic standards may lead to allegations of academic misconduct, which will be investigated by the Casework Office. Academic misconduct covers a variety of practices, such as: Plagiarism: copying another person’s ideas or words and presenting them as your own work, without the use of quotation marks and/or references;Self-plagiarism: reproducing parts of one of your assignments in another piece of work;Inventing, altering or falsifying the results of experiments or research;Commissioning another person to complete an assessment;Collaborating with others in the production of a piece of assessed work which is presented as entirely your own work;Cheating in an exam (e.g., by taking revision notes into the exam room). For full details of academic misconduct and how allegations are investigated, see the relevant section of the University’s academic regulations: https://student.londonmet.ac.uk/your-studies/student-administration/rules-and-regulations/academic-misconduct/. 6. Assessment All assessments are designed to support your learning and help you develop a deeper understanding of the topics covered in your module. Formative assessments provide an opportunity to learn and do not contribute to your grade.Summative assessments contribute to your overall mark and grades. To pass the module you must achieve an overall minimum mark of 40%. If you pass the module on re-assessment, the component you resit will be capped at a pass mark level of 40% Assessment Strategy The assessment strategy is designed to expose students to the main issues involved in the processes and production of visual special effects in the digital media industries. Summary Description of Assessment: Digital Video Special Effects sequence 60% + Essay 40% Assessment Type Description of item Weighting Qual Week Mark Due CWK 2 Digital video special 60% 60% 16 effects sequence CWK 1 Essay 40% 40% 11 A digital video special effects sequence designed to test students’ skills in the relevant motion graphics software and encourage analysis of problems and issues raised in the production. This part of the assessment is designed to test students’ creative skills and problem-solving abilities (Weighting 60%) An essay (2000 words) designed to demonstrate student’s awareness of the subject, test analytical skills and ability to communicate effectively. (Weighting 40%) Students may pass on aggregate Important Please note that cover sheets giving feedback on coursework or exams will be available from your tutor after submission. Please make sure you send an e-mail stating your student number to receive this feedback. Module Assessment Cycle The module assessment cycle shows all assessment related activities of your module. WeekActivityWeek 01You will have access to the overall module assessment plan indicating when formative and summative assessments are due.Week 02You will be given a formative assessment task to be submitted in Week 04.Week 03You will be informed about summative assignment details and assessment criteriaWeek 04You will be required to submit the formative task that you received in Week 02Week 05You will receive feedback on your formative assignment and you will be asked to reflect on your feedback. This will support and develop your learning and will help you in preparing for the summative assessment.Week 06You will have the opportunity to discuss the formative assessment feedback in class.Week 11Summative Coursework 1 due 3pm Day 1Week 16Summative Coursework 2 due 3pm Day 5 Summative Assessment guidelines Coursework 1 Essay + concept treatment (2000 words) due in week 11 – 40% analysing special effects and developing an original concept and treatment for production. This part of the assignment is designed to demonstrate student’s awareness of the subject, test analytical skills and ability to communicate effectively. The student should demonstrate the ability to visualise the final idea through their description, visualisations, storyboards, sample frames and renders. E 40-42% You will be awarded an E when you have demonstrated some understanding of special effects. However by providing a very descriptive account of your concept, you are very unlikely to achieve anything higher than a E. Your concept is based on little or no evidence of research, lacks originality and audience awareness. D 43-49% You will be awarded a D if you have demonstrated a good general level of understanding of special effects and their role in digital video production. You will have provided some evidence of having read relevant sources into the field. However by basing your work simply on lecture notes you are very unlikely to achieve anything higher than a D. Your concept shows evidence of some research, some audience awareness and little originality. You have provided little or no supporting visual materials. C 50-59% You will be awarded a C if you demonstrate evidence that you have gone beyond lecture notes and minimal sources to produce work which shows at least some clarity and originality of thought. You are unlikely to achieve higher than a C if you fail to produce a well-structured and comprehensive essay that critically analyses your conceptual approach. You have undertaken research for your concept, demonstrated some understanding of your target audience and some originality in your approach to the brief. You have provided a storyboard or sketches to visualise your idea. B 60-69% A B grade requires you to have undertaken relevant research or to have read a wide range of published material to inform your line of thought. Your essay will be well structured and will include good examples to underline your argumentation. You have undertaken research for your concept, understand your audience and demonstrate originality. The idea is visualised clearly using storyboards and supporting materials. A 70% + To gain an A grade, you will have met all the criteria for a B but also have demonstrated the ability to produce work of real intellectual clarity and originality. You will have shown substantial knowledge of theory and chosen appropriate examples to underline your argumentation. Your concept is clear, well researched and demonstrates great audience awareness and originality. The idea is visualised clearly and professionally using storyboards and supporting materials. Coursework 2 A digital video special effects sequence + concept development due in week 16 (60%) designed to test students’ skills in the relevant motion graphics software and encourage analysis of problems and issues raised in the production. This part of the assessment is designed to test students’ creative skills and problem-solving abilities E 40-42% You will be awarded an E when you have developed a concept and provide evidence of some understanding of post production techniques. However by providing a very weak concept and rational, demonstrating little evidence of having developed an original concept and only fulfilling minimal requirements for the video sequence you are very unlikely to achieve anything higher than a E. D 43-49% You will be awarded a D when you have provided some evidence of having developed an original concept. You will have demonstrated a general level of understanding of post production techniques and general ability to analyse the problem outlined by the brief. However by basing your work simply on tutorials, you are very unlikely to achieve anything higher than a D. C 50-59% You will be awarded a C if you demonstrate evidence that you have gone beyond tutorials to produce work which shows some originality and clarity. You will have provided evidence of having analysed and satisfactorily addressed the brief. You are unlikely to achieve higher than a C if you fail to engage directly with challenging ideas and address effectively the problem outlined by the brief and produce creative solutions. B 60-69% A B grade requires you to have undertaken substantial work and produced an original concept. You will have provided evidence of having carefully analysed and efficiently addressed the set brief. You will have produced an original video sequence of near professional standard using post production techniques with confidence. A 70% + To gain an A grade, you will have met all the criteria for a B but also have demonstrated the ability to produce work of real intellectual clarity and originality. You will have shown substantial knowledge of post production techniques and produced a concept and video sequence of professional standard. You will have demonstrated excellent ability to analyse the problem posed by the brief and provide appropriate solutions.

QUALITY: 100% ORIGINAL PAPER – NO PLAGIARISM – CUSTOM PAPER

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