BN309 Computer Forensics | My Assignment Tutor

BN309 Computer Forensics Laboratory 9 and 10: Recovering Graphics Files Submission Due: End of laboratory class, submit the file on Moodle at least 10 minutes before the end of laboratory class. Total Marks   = 10 marks for 10 weeks (DIT and BNet)                         = 5 marks for 10 weeks (GDNet and MNet) Marks will be given only to students who attend and participate during 2 hours laboratory class. Submission on Moodle is mandatory as an evidence of participation. Description of the laboratory exercise: In this lab, you use ProDiscover Basic to locate and extract JPEG files with altered extensions. Some of these files are embedded in files with non-JPEG extensions. The necessary software are available under “Software for Labs” folder. Activity 1:  In this project, you use ProDiscover Basic to locate and extract JPEG files with altered extensions. Some of these files are embedded in files with non-JPEG extensions. Find the C08frag.eve file in your work folder, and then follow these steps: 1. Start ProDiscover Basic (with the Run as administrator option if you’re using Vista) and begin a new project. In the New Project dialog box, type C08frag in the Project Number and Project File Name text boxes, and then click OK. 2. In the tree view, click to expand Add, and then click Image File. In the Open dialog box, navigate to your work folder and click C10frag.eve. Click Open, and then click Yes, if necessary, in the Auto Image Checksum message box. 3. Click the Search toolbar button. In the Search dialog box, click the Content Search tab. Under Search for the pattern(s), type JFIF, and under Select the Disk(s)/Image(s) you want to search in, click C08frag.eve. Click OK. 4. Click each file in the work area’s search results that doesn’t have a .jpg extension, and in the data area, scroll through each file to find any occurrences of a JFIF label. Click the check box next to each file with a JFIF label. When the Add Comment dialog box opens, type Recovered hidden .jpg file, click the Apply to all items check box, and then click OK. 5. In the tree view, click Report, and then click File, Print Report from the menu. You can also save your report by clicking the Export toolbar button, and in the Export dialog box’s File name text box, type C08Prj01.rtf, and then click OK. 6. Exit ProDiscover Basic, saving your project when prompted. Activity 2: In this activity, you continue the search for files Bob Aspen downloaded. In the in-chapter activity, you recovered three files containing “zzzz” for the first 4 bytes of altered JPEG files. These altered files had different extensions to hide the fact that they’re graphics files. Find the C08carve.eve file in your work folder. This image file is a new acquisition of another USB drive the EMTS manager retrieved. He wants to know whether any similar files on this drive match the files you recovered from the first USB drive. Because you know that the files you recovered earlier have zzzz for the first 4 bytes, you can use it as your search string to see whether similar files exist on this USB drive. 1. Start ProDiscover Basic (with the Run as administrator option if you’re using Vista) and begin a new project. In the New Project dialog box, type C08carve for the project number and project filename, and then click OK. 2. In the tree view, click to expand Add, and then click Image File. In the Open dialog box, navigate to your work folder and click C08carve.eve. Click Open, and then click Yes, if necessary, in the Auto Image Checksum message box. 3. Next, click the Search toolbar button. In the Search dialog box, click the Content Search tab, and then click the ASCII option button and the Case Sensitive check box. Under Search for the pattern(s), type zzzz, and under Select the Disk(s)/Image(s) you want to search in, click C08carve.eve. Click OK. 4. Click each file in the work area’s search results to display it in the data area. If the file contains zzzz at the beginning of the sector, click the Select check box next to it. In the Add Comment dialog box, type Similar file located on first USB drive, click the Apply to all items check box, and then click OK. 5. In the work area, click the Add to Report button. 6. Double-click the gametour5.txt file. In the work area, click the File Name column heading to sort all files in this pane. Scroll through the list of files and click the Select check box for the gametour1.txt, gametour2.txt, gametour3.txt, gametour4.txt, and gametour6.txt files. When the Add Comment dialog box opens, type Additional similar files on USB drive, and then click OK. Repeat this step for each gametour file you find. 7. Right-click the gametour1.txt file and click Copy All Selected Files. In the Choose Destination dialog box, click Browse, navigate to and click your work folder, and then click OK. 8. To complete your examination, in the tree view, click Report, and then click File, Print Report from the menu. You can also save your report by clicking the Export toolbar button, and in the Export dialog box’s File name text box, type C08Prj02.rtf. Then click OK. 9. Save the project and exit ProDiscover Basic. Activity 3:  In this project, you use IrfanView to open graphics files and save them in a compressed graphics format different from the original format. You should note any changes in image quality after converting files to a different format. Download IrfanView from www.irfanview.com and install it, and then follow these steps: Start IrfanView.      2. Click File, Open from the menu. In the Open dialog box, navigate to your work folder, and then double-click Spider.bmp to open the file.     3. Click File, Save as from the menu. Change the file type to JPG and save the file as Spider.jpg in the same location. Save Spider.jpg as Spider2.bmp in the same location.      5. Open these three graphics files in new sessions of IrfanView and compare the files. Document any changes you notice.      6. Open Flower.gif from your work folder, and save it as Flower.jpg in the same location. If your screen is cluttered with too many open IrfanView windows, close a few that you’re no longer working with. 7. Save Flower.jpg as Flower2.gif in the same location. 8. Open these three graphics files in new sessions of IrfanView, and document any changes you see when comparing the files. 9. Open Cartoon.bmp from your work folder, and save it as Cartoon.gif in the same location. 10. Save Cartoon.gif as Cartoon2.bmp in the same location. 11. Open these three graphics files in new sessions of IrfanView, and document any changes you see when comparing the files. 12. Exit all instances of IrfanView. Summarize your conclusions in a brief report and submit it to your instructor. Activity 4: In this project, you use S-Tools4 to create a steganography file for hiding an image. The software s then follow these steps: 1. In Windows Explorer, navigate to where you installed S-Tools4, and start the program by double-clicking S-Tools.exe. 2. Drag Rushmore.bmp from your work folder to the S-Tools window. 3. To hide text in the Rushmore.bmp file, drag findme.txt from your work folder to the Rushmore.bmp image. 4. In the Hiding 99 bytes dialog box, type FREEDOM in the Passphrase and Verify passphrase text boxes, and then click OK. A hidden data window opens in the S-Tools window. 5. Right-click the hidden data window and click Save as. Save the image as Steg.bmp in your work folder. 6. Close the Steg.bmp and Rushmore.bmp windows, but leave S-Tools open for the next project. Activity 5: In this project, you use S-Tools4 to create a secret message in a bitmap file and compare this steganography file to the original file by using the DOS Comp command. You need S-Tools4 and the Mission.bmp and USDECINP.rtf files in your work folder. Follow these steps to create a steganography file: 1. If you have exited S-Tools4, start it by double-clicking S-Tools.exe in Windows Explorer. 2. Drag Mission.bmp from your work folder to the S-Tools window. 3. Next, drag USDECINP.rtf from your work folder to the Mission.bmp image. 4. Type hop10-5 in the Passphrase and Verify passphrase text boxes, and then click OK. A hidden data window opens in the S-Tools window. 5. Right-click the hidden data window and click Save as. Save the image as Mission-steg.bmp in your work folder. Exit S-Tools. Next, you use the DOS Comp command to compare these two files and redirect the output to a text file for further analysis: 1. Click Start, type cmd in the Start Search text box, and then press Enter. (In Windows XP, click Start, Run, type cmd, and click OK.) 2. Change to your work folder by typing cd WorkChap08Projects (substituting the path to your work folder) and pressing Enter. 3. Type comp Mission.bmp Mission-steg.bmp > Mission-compare.txt and press Enter, and then at the Compare more files (Y/N) ? prompt, type n and press Enter. 4. Open the Mission-compare.txt file to see what discrepancies were found. When you’re finished, close the file, and exit the command prompt window by typing exit and pressing Enter. 5. To complete this project, write a one-page report on the number of mismatches and the deviation in each mismatch between the two files. In addition, state your observations of the differences in the two files, such as hexadecimal values and their patterns.

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