ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS | My Assignment Tutor

ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 1 of 25Subject GuideSubject Code: ECCDD103ASubject Name: CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTSCourse Code: HE20510Course Name: BACHELOR OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND CARE (BIRTH-5)Publication Date: February, 2021, V1ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 2 of 25Contents1. Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………….. 31.1. Subject overview ……………………………………………………………………………….31.2. Subject objective ……………………………………………………………………………….31.3. Subject learning outcomes………………………………………………………………….31.4. Subject content …………………………………………………………………………………41.5. Subject pre-requisites ………………………………………………………………………..41.6. Subject co-requisites ………………………………………………………………………….41.7. Subject credit points…………………………………………………………………………..51.8. Subject duration ………………………………………………………………………………..51.9. TAFE NSW graduate attributes …………………………………………………………….51.10. ACECQA qualification assessment………………………………………………………51.11. AITSL teacher accreditation……………………………………………………………….51.12. Subject assessment ………………………………………………………………………….61.13. Subject grading………………………………………………………………………………..61.14. Subject texts ……………………………………………………………………………………61.15. Subject readings ………………………………………………………………………………71.16. Subject journals and online resources ………………………………………………..71.17. Submission requirements………………………………………………………………….71.18. Student conduct and academic standards …………………………………………..72. Subject schedule……………………………………………………………………………. 8Assessment Event Schedule ……………………………………………………………… 201. Assessment Event 1 – Report ……………………………………………………………….202. Assessment Event 2 – Documentation and Planning……………………………….223.3 Assessment Event 3 – Test………………………………………………………………….253. Assessment event schedule …………………………………………………………………………..183.1 Assessment event 1-Report……………………………………………………………………..183.2 Assessment event 1- Documentation and Planning ….………………………………….203.3 Assessment event 1- Test …………………………………………..……………………………23ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 3 of 251. Introduction1.1. Subject overviewThis subject is designed to provide students with the opportunity to study the formation of children’ssense of self-identity and their social, emotional and psychological development. Students will gain anin-depth understanding of the theories and underpinning knowledge of self-identity development.Students will practice skills in documenting identity, emotional, social and psychological developmentusing relevant documentation techniques and will be able to interpret these observations against arange of theories. They will also explore the role that self-identity plays in our society, our health,wellbeing and socialisation. Students will critique external factors and contexts which impact on thedevelopment of self-identity, emotional, social and psychological skills and learn how to promote goodmental health awareness practices in the community. Students will design plans and strategies foradjusting educational experiences to meet the needs of a diverse range of learners.1.2. Subject objectiveThe aim of this subject is to enable students to develop knowledge about the social, emotional andpsychological wellbeing and development of young children in order to understand children’sbehaviour and provide care and learning environments that effectively support children’s self-identity,psychological wellbeing and social competence.1.3. Subject learning outcomesAt the end of this subject students will be able to:1. Discuss the effects that early childhood settings have on children’s social,emotional/psychological wellbeing2. Discuss social, emotional/psychological aspects of development and apply strategies fordeveloping children’s sense of agency and self-identity3. Promote collaborative learning, a sense of belonging and social responsibility within thefamily contextECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 4 of 251.4. Subject contentThe table below summarises the content knowledge students will acquire from this subject: WEEKCONTENT TOPIC1.Identity and social and emotional development2.Aspects of self-identity3.Identity and personality4.Attachment and resilience5.Emotional development6.Assessing emotional wellbeing7.Characteristics of social competence8.Assessing social competence9.Spiritual and moral development10.Family contexts and self-identity11.Promoting self-identity and wellbeing through learning environments12.Social influences13.BEdEC subject tests and professional experience orientation week14.Professional Experience Week 115.Professional Experience Week 216.Professional experience debrief and assessment submission 1.5. Subject pre-requisitesNil.1.6. Subject co-requisitesNil.ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 5 of 251.7. Subject credit pointsThis subject is worth 10 credit points.1.8. Subject durationThis subject is delivered over 12 weeks.Students are expected to undertake 10 hours of study for this subject each week in order to achievethe subject learning outcomes. The 10 hours of study will involve lectures, tutorials, engagement inthe subject Learner Management System (LMS) Moodle and private study.1.9. TAFE NSW graduate attributesAs a result of successfully completing this subject, students will have developed a number of graduateattributes that will enhance their employability and contribution to the Australian workforce. For thissubject these include:1. TAFE NSW Higher Education graduates will have the ability to develop and employ a body ofknowledge within a professional and applied context.2. TAFE NSW Higher Education graduates will have the ability to communicate effectively in theprofession using a variety of text and media.1.10. ACECQA qualification assessmentThis subject contributes to student knowledge and learning towards the following ACECQAqualification assessment:1. Child development and care2. Teaching pedagogies4. History and philosophy of early childhood5. Family and community contexts6. Education and curriculum studies1.11. AITSL teacher accreditationThis subject contributes to student knowledge and learning towards the following early childhoodAustralian Professional Standards for Teachers:ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 6 of 25Standard 1 – Know students and how they learn.Standard 2 – Know the content and how to teach it.Standard 3 – Plan for and implement effective teaching and learning.Standard 4 – Create and maintain supportive and safe learning environments.Standard 7 – Engage professionally with colleagues, parents/carers and the community.1.12. Subject assessmentThe table below summarises assessment requirements for this subject. Students must attempt eachassessment event to meet the subject learning outcomes. Specific subject Assessment Event Detailswill be provided to students via the Learner Management System (LMS) Moodle. Assessment EventWeightingLearningOutcomesAssessed1. Report40%1 and 22. Documentation and Planning30%2 and 33. Test30%1, 2 and 3 1.13. Subject gradingGrades for individual assessment events and the subject as a whole are awarded as follows:High Distinction: marks ranging from 85 to 100%Distinction: marks ranging from 75 to < 85%Credit: marks ranging from 65 to < 75%Pass: marks ranging from 50 to < 65%Fail: marks under 50%1.14. Subject textsBerk, L. (2013). Child Development (9th ed.). USA: Pearson Education Inc.ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 7 of 251.15. Subject readingsA list of readings to support weekly topics is provided in the Subject Schedule below and on thesubject Learner Management System (LMS) Moodle. Readings are available in the Bachelor ofEducation Early Childhood LibGuide https://tafensw.libguides.com/EarlyChildhoodDegree1.16. Subject journals and online resourcesA list of materials to support weekly topics is provided in the subject schedule below and on thesubject Learner Management System (LMS) Moodle. Readings are available in the Bachelor ofEducation Early Childhood LibGuide https://tafensw.libguides.com/EarlyChildhoodDegree1.17. Submission requirementsYour teacher will advise you of the format required for each assessment task and the format forsubmission, which may be electronically.Each assessment task must include a declaration indicating that the work is your own work and hasnot been previously submitted.Additional assessment information, including provisions for special circumstances and misadventure,requests for an extension of the assessment due date or to resubmit an assessment or sit an exam ata later date, can be found in the TAFE NSW Higher Education Assessment policy and procedureswhich you can download at:www.tafensw.edu.au/degrees1.18. Student conduct and academic standardsTAFE NSW Higher Education encourages high standards of professional behaviour and academicconduct. You must conduct all work associated with this course in a manner that is environmentally,socially and culturally responsible, so as not to cause harm or disrespect to the environment, peopleor their values and beliefs.You shall hold confidential all information about any specific organisation and their business orbusiness activities, which may be divulged in the process of a work placement, lecture or tutorial,including lectures given by industry guest lecturers.It is the policy of TAFE NSW Higher Education that respect and acknowledgement is given tointellectual property created by academics, writers, practitioners and other students whose work iscited in your submissions, or used to illustrate them. It is therefore important to use the APA 6thEdition citation system and include a reference list with every submission, to acknowledge theintellectual property of others that you have used to support your own proposals or position.Penalties apply for plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct.Further information about academic conduct can be found in the TAFE NSW Higher EducationAcademic Integrity and honesty policy and procedures which you can download at:www.tafensw.edu.au/degreesECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 8 of 252. Subject scheduleThe weekly schedule below must be read in conjunction with information provided on the LearnerManagement System (LMS) Moodle.The tutorial experiences listed below are a guide only and may be contextualised by lecturers and tutors.It is compulsory for students to complete all required readings in order to participate in lectures andtutorials. WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIESO WeekOrientation activities Subject introduction Subject schedule Assessment event scheduleWeek 1Topic: Identity and social and emotional development Development milestones of self-identity, social and emotional development What is self-identity, self-concept and self-esteem? Influencing factors and theories Key terminology and definitionsPrescribed text:Berk, L. (2013). History, theory and applied directions. In Child development (9th ed.,ch. 1, pp. 2-39). Pearson Education.Berk, L. (2013). Self and social understanding. In Child development (9th ed., ch. 11, pp.446-484). Pearson Education.Reading:Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2018). Programming andplanning in early childhood settings (7th ed., pp. 87-94). Cengage.Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for the Council ofAustralian Governments. (2009). Children have a strong sense of identity. InBelonging, being & becoming: The Early Years Learning Framework forAustralia (Outcome 1, pp. 22-27). http://education.gov.au/early-yearslearning-framework ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 9 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIESTutorial: Work as a group to identify the key terms for this subject. Based on the listdevelop a terminology and definitions document. Remember to design thedocument so you can add to it as the subject progresses. Self-reflection – What are the relationships between belonging, being andbecoming (as per the EYLF)? How do they incorporate the theories discussed inthe lecture? Discussion – How we can assist children to develop their own positive selfconcept within an early childhood setting. Consider the environment, the roleof the educator and the practices and principles of the EYLF.Week 2Topic: Aspects of self-identity Constructing identity Gender identity and gender roles Racial and cultural identity Exploring self-identity with childrenPrescribed text:Berk, L. (2013). Development of sex differences. In Child development (9th ed., ch. 13,pp. 528-565). Pearson Education.Readings:Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2018). Programming andplanning in early childhood settings (7th ed., pp. 87-94). Cengage.Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for the Council ofAustralian Governments. (2009). Belonging, being & becoming: The Early YearsLearning Framework for Australia. http://education.gov.au/early-years-learningframeworkBlack, R., Korobkova, K. & Epler, A. (2014, July 31). Barbie girls and Xtractaurs:Discourse and identity in virtual worlds for young children. Journal of EarlyChildhood Literacy, 14(2), 265-285. https://doi.org/10.1177/1468798413494920http://ecl.sagepub.com/content/14/2/265.full.pdfHalim, M., Ruble, D., Tamis-LeMonda, C., Zosuls, K., Lurye, L. & Greulich, F. (2014,April). Pink frilly dresses and the avoidance of all things ‘girly’: Children’s ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 10 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIESappearance rigidity and cognitive theories of gender development.Developmental Psychology, 50(4), 1091-1101. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0034906Seele, C. (2012, November 7). Ethnicity in early childhood. International Journal ofEarly Childhood, 44(3), 307-325. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13158-012-0070-1Tremblay, M., Gokiert, R., Georgis, R., Edwards, K. & Skrypnek, B. (2013, October 2).Aboriginal perspectives on social-emotional competence in early childhood.International Indigenous Policy Journal, 4(4), 1-19.10.18584/iipj.2013.4.4.2Tutorial: In small groups, identify how your gender/culture was influenced as you grewup. What factors affected your gender understanding and your understandingof your family and its values? Consider books, television, the media, clothingand toy choices. Explore children’s literature and the representation of gender and culturewithin. Source a picture book that illustrates non-stereotypic roles/concepts. Discussion – How can we encourage children to develop a sense of who theyare, where they belong and how much they feel valued and respected?Week 3Topic: Identity and personality Personality and temperament Theoretical perspectives Analysing temperament Personality and EriksonPrescribed text:Berk, L. (2013). History, Theory and applied directions. In Child development (9th ed.,ch. 1, pp. 2-39). Pearson Education.Berk, L. (2013). Emotional development. In Child development (9th ed., ch. 10, pp. 400-445). Pearson EducationReadings:Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2018). Programming andplanning in early childhood settings (7th ed., pp. 87-94). Cengage. ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 11 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIESDenham, S., Bassett, H. & Zinsser, K. (2012, June). Early childhood teachers associalisers of young children’s emotional competence. Early ChildhoodEducation Journal, 40(3), 137-143. DOI: 10.1007/s10643-012-0504-2Tutorial: Applying temperament theory:o Examine the observations of a preschool child provided in the tutorial. Consider the personality and temperament of the child and discuss how this isexplained by Erikson’s theory.Week 4Topic: Attachment and resilience Theoretical perspectives Influences and impacts Attachment and protective factors What is resilience?Prescribed text:Berk, L. (2013). Emotional development. In Child development (9th ed., ch. 10, pp. 400-445). Pearson Education.Readings:Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2018). Programming andplanning in early childhood settings (7th ed., pp. 87-94). Cengage.Colmer, K., Rutherford, L. & Murphy, P. (2011, December 1). Attachment theory andprimary caregiving. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 36(4), 16-20.https://doi.org/10.1177/183693911103600403Linke, P. & Radich, J. (2010, December 1). Children’s resilience: Working with the EarlyYears Learning Framework. Early Childhood Australia. Research in PracticeSeries, 17(4).Tutorial: “Attachment is a deep and enduring emotional bond that connects one personto another across time and space”. Discuss this statement and its relevance intoday’s early childhood setting. Consider strategies that educators can use toencourage attachment. Identify strategies to encourage resilience in young children. ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 12 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIESWeek 5Topic: Emotional development Emotional expression Emotional understanding – empathy Emotional intelligence and literacy Emotional difficultiesPrescribed texts:Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for the Council ofAustralian Governments. (2009). Belonging, being & becoming: The Early YearsLearning Framework for Australia. http://education.gov.au/early-yearslearning-frameworkBerk, L. (2013). Emotional development. In Child development (9th ed., ch. 10, pp. 400-445). Pearson EducationReadings:Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2018). Programming andplanning in early childhood settings (7th ed., pp. 87-94). Cengage.Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for the Council ofAustralian Governments. (2009). Belonging, being & becoming: The Early YearsLearning Framework for Australia. http://education.gov.au/early-yearslearning-frameworkChen. F. (2015, June 1). Parents’ and children’s emotion regulation strategies inemotionally situated zones: A cultural-historical perspective. AustralasianJournal of Early Childhood, 40(2), 107-116.https://doi.org/10.1177/183693911504000213Fleer. M., & Hammer. M. (2013, September 1). ‘Perezhivanie’ in group settings: Acultural-historical reading of emotion regulation. Australasian Journal of EarlyChildhood Education, 38(3), 127-143.https://doi.org/10.1177/183693911303800316Slee PT, Murray-Harvey R, Dix KL, Skrzypiec G, Askell-Williams H, Lawson M & Krieg S(2012). KidsMatter Early Childhood Evaluation Report. Shannon ResearchPress. ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 13 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIEShttps://www.researchgate.net/publication/280082254_KidsMatter_Early_Childhood_Evaluation_ReportTutorial: Considering your understanding of emotional intelligence, think about thechild who is experiencing difficulties. How might you, as an early childhoodteacher, foster this development? Can it be fostered? Write a brief that youcould deliver to staff at an upcoming staff meeting on this topic.Week 6Topic: Assessing emotional wellbeing Monitoring emotional wellbeing Observable behaviours Identifying individual traits Applying concepts from the EYLFRecommended text:Nilsen, B. (2017). Using frequency counts to look at emotional development. In Weekby week: Plans for documenting children’s development. (7th ed., ch. 6, pp. 141-170). Cengage.Readings:Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2018). Programming andplanning in early childhood settings (7th ed., pp. 87-94). Cengage.Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. (2012, April 10). Social and emotionalwellbeing: Development of A Children’s Headline Indicator.https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/children-youth/social-emotional-wellbeingdevelopment-of-chi/contents/table-of-contentsBarblett, l. & Maloney, C. (2010, June 1). Complexities of assessing social andemotional competence and wellbeing in young children. Australasian Journal ofEarly Childhood, 35(2), 13-18. https://doi.org/10.1177/183693911003500203Nilsen, B. (2017). Using frequency counts to look at emotional development. In Weekby week: Plans for documenting children’s development (7th ed., ch. 6, pp. 141-170). Cengage.Sims, M. (2010). Beginning the planning. In Social inclusion and the early years learningframework: A way of working (ch. 2, pp. 11-38). Pademelon. ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 14 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIESTutorial: Applying your knowledge and research from the EYLF, discuss how you as anearly childhood teacher can foster the emotional wellbeing of children in yourcare? How can you involve parents and carers in assisting children to developin a positive and healthy way? Design a poster that could be displayed in aservice to provide information to staff and families.Week 7Topic: Characteristics of social competence Play and social behaviours Friendships and peer influences Promoting social inclusion Social difficultiesPrescribed text:Berk, L. (2013). Peers, media and schooling. In Child development (9th ed.) (ch.15, pp.606-652). Pearson Education.Reading:Hawkins, K. (2014, September 1). Looking forward, looking back: Framing the future forteaching for social justice in early childhood education. Australasian Journal ofEarly Childhood, 39(3). 121-128.https://doi.org/10.1177/183693911403900315McArdle, P., Young, R., Quibell, T., Moseley, D., Johnson, R. & LeCouter, A. (2011,January 14). Early intervention for at risk children: 3 year follow-up. EuropeanChild Adolescent Psychiatry, 20(3), 111-120. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00787-010-0148-yTutorial: Discussion topic – The changing nature and impact of pro-social behavioursduring infancy and early childhood. In small groups and using a variety of materials, suggest ways you can:o Support children to understand their own feelings and the feelings ofothers.o Model the social behaviour you want to encourage in the child. Role-play some situations that will model ideas for social inclusion. ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 15 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIESWeek 8Topic: Assessing social competence Monitoring social competence Observable behaviours Identifying individual traits Applying concepts from the EYLFReadings:Barblett, l. & Maloney, C. (2010). Complexities of assessing social and emotionalcompetence and wellbeing in young children. Australasian Journal of EarlyChildhood, 35(2), 13-18.https://doi.org/10.1177/183693911003500203Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for the Council ofAustralian Governments. (2009). Belonging, being & becoming: The Early YearsLearning Framework for Australia. http://education.gov.au/early-yearslearning-frameworkDepartment of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for the Council ofAustralian Governments. (2010). Educators belonging, being & becoming:Educators’ guide to the Early Years Learning Framework for Australia.https://docs.education.gov.au/system/files/doc/other/educators_guide_to_the_early_years_learning_framework_for_australia.pdfSims, M. (2010). Beginning the planning. In Social inclusion and the Early YearsLearning Framework: A way of working (ch. 2, pp. 11-38). Pademelon.Tutorial: With a large number of children enrolled in centre-based programs, educatorsand caregivers play an important role in promoting the development of prosocial skills. Using your notes, texts and research, discuss how you can observe and plan forchildren who are developing early social skills competence.Week 9Topic: Spiritual and moral development Theoretical understandings Characteristics and behaviours Self-regulation and self-control Pro-social and antisocial behaviours ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 16 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIESPrescribed text:Berk, L. (2013). Moral development. In Child development (9th ed., ch. 12, pp. 484-527). Pearson Education.Hawkins, K. (2014, September 1). Looking forward, looking back: Framing the future forteaching for social justice in early childhood education. Australasian Journal ofEarly Childhood, 39(3). 121-128.https://doi.org/10.1177/183693911403900315Tutorial: How do Piaget’s theory and Kohlberg’s ideas relate to your understanding ofchildren’s early moral development? Discuss how educators’ can help childrenextend their moral understandings. Consider how educators can use resources like storytelling, and imaginativeand dramatic play to encourage the development of moral understanding andpro-social behaviour.Week 10Topic: Family contexts and self-identity Family contexts and children’s self-identity Socialisation and the family Family and the communityPrescribed text:Berk, L. (2013). The family. In Child development (9th ed., ch. 14, pp. 566-605). PearsonEducation.Readings:Preston, K., Gottfried, A., Oliver, P., Delany, D., Gottfried, A. & Ibrahim, S. (2016,October). Positive family relationships: Longitudinal network of relations.Journal of family Psychology, 30(7), 875-885.https://doi.org/10.1037/fam0000243Tutorial: Using this week’s readings and lecture content, reflect on and discuss howBronfenbrenner’s ecological systems theory relates to family contexts andchildren’s self-identity.Week 11Topic: Promoting self-identity and wellbeing through learning environments ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 17 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIES interactions and experiences Encouraging empathy and respect Welcoming spaces Promoting a sense of security Supporting autonomy and independence Encouraging a sense of agencyReadings:Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for the Council ofAustralian Governments. (2009). Belonging, being & becoming: The Early YearsLearning Framework for Australia.http://education.gov.au/early-years-learning-frameworkDepartment of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations for the Council ofAustralian Governments. (2010). Educators belonging, being & becoming:Educators’ guide to the Early Years Learning Framework for Australia.https://docs.education.gov.au/system/files/doc/other/educators_guide_to_the_early_years_learning_framework_for_australia.pdfHawkins, K. (2014, September 1). Looking forward, looking back: Framing thefuture for teaching for social justice in early childhood education.Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 39(3). 121-128.https://doi.org/10.1177/183693911403900315Merton, J. (2018, Spring). Empowering children: building social resilience andemotional wellbeing in the early years. Educating Young Children, 24(3). 40-43.Sims, M. (2010). All starts with values. In Social inclusion and the Early Years LearningFramework: A way of working (ch. 1, pp. 1-10). Pademelon.Sims, M. (2010). Implementing our plan. In Social inclusion and the Early YearsLearning Framework: A way of working (ch. 3, pp. 39-52). Pademelon.Sims, M. (2010). Planning in the home. In Social inclusion and the Early Years LearningFramework: A way of working (ch. 4, pp. 53-60). Pademelon.Tutorial: ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 18 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIES Workshop – Design your own education and care entrance foyer. How can youshow parents that you value them as parents and caregivers – not just asclients? Follow this with a room design that will include collaborative learning and anenvironment to encourage active learners and participants in their ownenvironment. Your room will promote a variety of learning styles andincorporate a cultural and inclusive feel and encourage the development ofpro-social behaviour and a sense of agency. Consider the ELYF and prepare a report in class on the way we can develop andrespect diversity in an early childhood setting. How can we, as educatorspromote positive attitudes to inclusion and positive behaviour?Week 12Topic: Social influences Cultural influences and diversity Media and technology Transition to schoolPrescribed text:Berk, L. (2013). The Family. In Child development (9th ed., ch. 14, pp. 566-605).Pearson Education.Berk, L. (2013). Peers, media, and Schooling. In Child development (9th ed., ch. 15, pp.606-652). Pearson EducationReadings:Australian Council on Children and the Media (ACCM). (n.d.)). Too sexy, too soon: Thesexualisation of children in the media. [Factsheet].http://childrenandmedia.org.au/assets/files/resources/fact-sheets/impact-ofcontent/Too-sexy%2C-Too-soon.pdfAustralian Council on Children and the Media (ACCM). (2012). Effects of the mediafrom a child development perspective. [Factsheet].http://childrenandmedia.org.au/assets/files/resources/factsheets/developmental-stages/Effects-of-the-media-from-a-child-developmentperspective-.pdf ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 19 of 25 WEEK NO:TOPICS AND ACTIVITIESPickering, J., & Sanders. M. (2015, June). The triple P-Positive Parenting Program: Anexample of a public health approach to evidence-based parenting support.Family Matters, 96, 53-63.https://bettercarenetwork.org/sites/default/files/The%20Triple%20P%20Positive%20Parenting%20Program%20-%20An%20Example%20of%20a%20Public%20Health%20Approach%20to%20Evidence-Based%20Parenting%20Support.pdfTutorial: Debate the positive and negative views in the literature of using media andtechnology in Early Childhood Services. Consider search engines, computerprograms, YouTube and their effect on socialisation of children.Week 13BEdEC subject tests and professional experience orientation weekWeek 14Professional Experience Week 1Week 15Professional Experience Week 2Week 16Professional experience debrief and assessment submission ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 20 of 25Assessment Event Schedule1. Assessment Event 1 – ReportTitle: Children’s development of self-identityWeighting: 40%Length: 3000 wordsDue: Week 6Learning outcomes: 1 and 2For this assessment, you will need to: Write a report that covers the following topics:1. Discuss the importance of social, emotional and psychological development of youngchildren.2. Discuss the role of the early childhood environment including the educator in fosteringchildren’s social, emotional and psychological wellbeing.Your assessment should show evidence that you have read widely on the topic beyond the suppliedreadings and texts. Your assessment must use correct referencing, in APA style.All submissions must comply with the requirements listed in the Student Handbook for this course.The criteria for marking this assessment are given belowECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 21 of 25 ECCDD103A – CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS ASSESSMENT 1: REPORT WEIGHTING: 40%FAIL< 50%PASS50% – 64%CREDIT65% – 74%DISTINCTION75% – 84%HIGH DISTINCTION85% – 100%MARKSUse of academic and disciplineconventions and sources of evidenceInadequate organisation,presentation, structure,academic language and followingof style guidelines.Adequate organisation,presentation, structure, academiclanguage and following of styleguidelines.Effective organisation,presentation, structure,academic language andfollowing of style guidelines.Comprehensive organisation,presentation, structure, academiclanguage and following of styleguidelines.Cohesive organisation,presentation, structure, academiclanguage and following of styleguidelines.10Inadequate use of currentsubject and peer reviewedliterature and/or crediblesourced reports and documentsand/or research.Adequate use of current subjectand peer reviewed literatureand/or credible sourced reportsand documents and/or research.Effective use of current subjectand peer reviewed literatureand/or credible sourced reportsand documents and/orresearch.Comprehensive use of currentsubject and peer reviewedliterature and/or credible sourcedreports and documents and/orresearch.Cohesive use of current subject andpeer reviewed literature and/orcredible sourced reports anddocuments and/or research.10In text citation / referencing andreference list is incorrect.In text citation / referencing andreference list is correct in someinstances.In text citation / referencingand reference list is generallycorrect.In text citation / referencing andreference list is consistentlycorrect.In text citation / referencing andreference list is completely correct.10Academic writing is incoherentwith numerous grammatical,spelling, word choice and syntaxerrors.Academic writing is coherent withmostly correct grammar, spelling,word choice and syntax.Academic writing is effectivewith correct grammar, spelling,word choice and syntax.Academic writing structure iscomprehensive with correctgrammar, spelling, word choiceand syntax.Writing structure is cohesive withfluency, correct grammar, spelling,word choice and syntax.10Content knowledge, understandingand synthesisEssay shows an inadequatedescription of the social,emotional and psychologicalaspects of development forchildren aged birth to 5 years.Essay shows an adequatedescription of the social,emotional and psychologicalaspects of development forchildren aged birth to 5 years.Essay shows an effectivedescription of the social,emotional and psychologicalaspects of development forchildren aged birth to 5 years.Essay shows a comprehensivedescription of the social,emotional and psychologicalaspects of development forchildren aged birth to 5 years.Essay shows a cohesive descriptionof the social, emotional andpsychological aspects ofdevelopment for children agedbirth to 5 years.20Essay shows an inadequatediscussion of current theoryabout how infants and youngchildren develop self-identity.Essay shows an adequatediscussion of current theoryabout how infants and youngchildren develop self-identity.Essay shows an effectivediscussion of current theoryabout how infants and youngchildren develop self-identity.Essay shows a comprehensivediscussion of current theoryabout how infants and youngchildren develop self-identity.Essay shows a cohesive discussionof current theory about howinfants and young children developself-identity.20Essay shows an inadequatediscussion of ways in which earlychildhood settings and educatorscan affect children’s social,emotional and psychologicalwellbeing.Essay shows an adequatediscussion of ways in which earlychildhood settings and educatorscan affect children’s social,emotional and psychologicalwellbeing.Essay shows an effectivediscussion of ways in whichearly childhood settings andeducators can affect children’ssocial, emotional andpsychological wellbeing.Essay shows a comprehensivediscussion of ways in which earlychildhood settings and educatorscan affect children’s social,emotional and psychologicalwellbeing.Essay shows a cohesive discussionof ways in which early childhoodsettings and educators can affectchildren’s social, emotional andpsychological wellbeing.20GradeInadequate answering of theassessment brief.Adequate answering of theassessment brief.Effective answering of theassessment brief.Comprehensive answering of theassessment brief.Cohesive answering of theassessment brief. ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 22 of 252. Assessment Event 2 – Documentation and PlanningTitle: Developing Children’s Sense of Agency and Self-identityWeighting: 30%Length: 2000 wordsDue: Week 11Learning outcomes: 2 and 3For this assessment, you will need to: Develop 3 intentional teaching experiences that encourage the social, emotional andpsychological development for children birth – 2 years , 2 – 3 years land 3 – 5 years (3 in total)Ensure each planned experience includes a rationale and learning outcomes to supportsocial, emotional and psychological development and shows clear links to theory. Design an indoor learning space and an outdoor learning space for two (2) different agegroups. Explain how your learning space/environment supports collaborative learning,children’s sense of agency, self-identity, social responsibility and family context and showsclear links to theory.Your assessment should show evidence that you have read widely on the topic beyond the suppliedreadings and texts. Your assessment must use correct referencing, in APA style.All submissions must comply with the requirements listed in the Student Handbook for this course.The criteria for marking this assessment are given below.ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 23 of 25 ECCDD103A – CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS ASSESSMENT 2: DOCUMENTATION AND PLANNING WEIGHTING: 30%FAIL< 50%PASS50% – 64%CREDIT65% – 74%DISTINCTION75% – 84%HIGH DISTINCTION85% – 100%MARKSInadequate organisation,presentation, structure,academic language andfollowing of style guidelines.Adequate organisation,presentation, structure,academic language andfollowing of style guidelines.Effective organisation,presentation, structure,academic language andfollowing of style guidelines.Comprehensive organisation,presentation, structure,academic language and followingof style guidelines.Cohesive organisation,presentation, structure,academic language andfollowing of style guidelines.10Inadequate use of currentsubject and peer reviewedliterature and/or crediblesourced reports anddocuments and/or research.Adequate use of currentsubject and peer reviewedliterature and/or crediblesourced reports anddocuments and/or research.Effective use of currentsubject and peer reviewedliterature and/or crediblesourced reports anddocuments and/or research.Comprehensive use of currentsubject and peer reviewedliterature and/or crediblesourced reports and documentsand/or research.Cohesive use of currentsubject and peer reviewedliterature and/or crediblesourced reports anddocuments and/or research.10In text citation / referencingand reference list is incorrect.In text citation / referencingand reference list is correct insome instances.In text citation / referencingand reference list isgenerally correct.In text citation / referencing andreference list is consistentlycorrect.In text citation / referencingand reference list iscompletely correct.10Academic writing isincoherent with numerousgrammatical, spelling, wordchoice and syntax errors.Academic writing is coherentwith mostly correct grammar,spelling, word choice andsyntax.Academic writing is effectivewith correct grammar,spelling, word choice andsyntax.Academic writing structure iscomprehensive with correctgrammar, spelling, word choiceand syntax.Writing structure is cohesivewith fluency, correctgrammar, spelling, wordchoice and syntax.10Observations demonstrate aninadequate level ofknowledge relating children’ssense of agency and selfidentity.Observations demonstrate anadequate level of knowledgerelating children’s sense ofagency and self-identity.Observations demonstratean effective level ofknowledge relatingchildren’s sense of agencyand self-identity.Observations demonstrate acomprehensive level ofknowledge relating children’ssense of agency and self-identity.Observations demonstrate acohesive level of knowledgerelating children’s sense ofagency and self-identity.10Interpretations demonstratean inadequate level ofknowledge relating children’ssense of agency and selfidentity.Interpretations demonstratean adequate level ofknowledge relating children’ssense of agency and selfidentity.Interpretations demonstratean effective level ofknowledge relatingchildren’s sense of agencyand self-identity.Interpretations demonstrate acomprehensive level ofknowledge relating children’ssense of agency and self-identity.Interpretations demonstratea cohesive level ofknowledge relatingchildren’s sense of agencyand self-identity.10Planned experiencesdemonstrate an inadequatelevel of knowledge relatingchildren’s sense of agency andself-identity.Planned experiencesdemonstrate an adequatelevel of knowledge relatingchildren’s sense of agency andself-identity.Planned experiencesdemonstrate an effectivelevel of knowledge relatingchildren’s sense of agencyand self-identity.Planned experiencesdemonstrate a comprehensivelevel of knowledge relatingchildren’s sense of agency andself-identity.Planned experiencesdemonstrate a cohesive levelof knowledge relatingchildren’s sense of agencyand self-identity.20 ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 24 of 25 Inadequate design of anindoor and outdoor learningspace for 0-3 year olds thatpromotes children’s sense ofagency, self-identity, socialresponsibility and being,belonging and becoming.Adequate design of an indoorand outdoor learning spacefor 0-3 year olds thatpromotes children’s sense ofagency, self-identity, socialresponsibility and being,belonging and becoming.Effective design of an indoorand outdoor learning spacefor 0-3 year olds thatpromotes children’s senseof agency, self-identity,social responsibility andbeing, belonging andbecoming.Comprehensive design of anindoor and outdoor learningspace for 0-3 year olds thatpromotes children’s sense ofagency, self-identity, socialresponsibility and being,belonging and becoming.Cohesive design of an indoorand outdoor learning spacefor 0-3 year olds thatpromotes children’s sense ofagency, self-identity, socialresponsibility and being,belonging and becoming.10Inadequate design of acollaborative indoor andoutdoor learning space for 3-5year olds that promoteschildren’s sense of agency,self-identity, socialresponsibility and being,belonging and becoming.Adequate design of acollaborative indoor andoutdoor learning space for 3-5year olds that promoteschildren’s sense of agency,self-identity, socialresponsibility and being,belonging and becoming.Effective design of acollaborative indoor andoutdoor learning space for3-5 year olds that promoteschildren’s sense of agency,self-identity, socialresponsibility and being,belonging and becoming.Comprehensive design of acollaborative indoor and outdoorlearning space for 3-5 year oldsthat promotes children’s sense ofagency, self-identity, socialresponsibility and being,belonging and becoming.Cohesive design of acollaborative indoor andoutdoor learning space for 3-5 year olds that promoteschildren’s sense of agency,self-identity, socialresponsibility and being,belonging and becoming.10Inadequate answering of theassessment brief.Adequate answering of theassessment brief.Effective answering of theassessment brief.Comprehensive answering of theassessment brief.Cohesive answering of theassessment brief. ECCDD103A CHILDREN’S SELF-IDENTITY AND FAMILY CONTEXTS© TAFE NSW – Higher Education Page | 25 of 253.3 Assessment Event 3 – TestTitle: Class TestWeighting: 30%Due: Week 13Length: 1.5 hoursLearning outcomes: 1, 2 and 3For this written test you will be assessed on weekly subject content through multiple choice and shortanswer questions on supporting infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers self-identity.

QUALITY: 100% ORIGINAL PAPER – NO PLAGIARISM – CUSTOM PAPER

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