Project Management Essentials | My Assignment Tutor

BPP Coursework Cover SheetPlease use the table below as your cover sheet for the 1st page of the submission. The sheet shouldbe before the cover/title page of your submission. ProgrammeModule nameSchedule TermStudent Reference Number (SRN)Report/Assignment TitleDate of Submission(Please attach the confirmation of anyextension received)Declaration of Original Work:I hereby declare that I have read and understood BPP’s regulations on plagiarism and that this is myoriginal work, researched, undertaken, completed and submitted in accordance with the requirementsof BPP School of Business and Technology.The word count, excluding contents table, bibliography and appendices, is ___ words.Student Reference Number: Date:By submitting this coursework, you agree to all rules and regulations of BPP regardingassessments and awards for programmes. Please note, submission is your declaration you are fitto sit.BPP University reserves the right to use all submitted work for educational purposes and mayrequest that work be published for a wider audience.BPP School of Business and Technology MSc ManagementProject Management EssentialsCoursework Assessment BriefSubmission mode: Turnitin online access1. General Assessment Guidance Your summative assessment for this module is made up of this Coursework submission whichaccounts for 100% of the marksPlease note late submissions will not be marked.You are required to submit all elements of your assessment via Turnitin online access. Onlysubmissions made via the specified mode will be accepted and hard copies or any other digitalform of submissions (like via email or pen drive etc.) will not be accepted.For coursework, the submission word limit is 5000 words. You must comply with the word countguidelines. You may submit LESS than 5000 words but not more. Word Count guidelines can befound on your programme home page and the coursework submission page.Do not put your name or contact details anywhere on your submission. You should only put your student registration number (SRN) which will ensure your submission is recognised in themarking process. A total of 100 marks are available for this module assessment, and you are required to achieveminimum 50% to pass this module.You are required to use only Harvard Referencing System in your submission. Any content which is already published by other author(s) and is not referenced will be considered as a case ofplagiarism. You can find further information on Harvard Referencing in the online library on the Hub (Foundvia Help&Support). You can use the following link to access this information:http://bpp.libguides.com/Home/StudySupportBPP University has a strict policy regarding authenticity of assessments. In proven instances of plagiarism or collusion, severe punishment will be imposed on offenders. You are advised toread the rules and regulations regarding plagiarism and collusion in the GARs and MOPP whichare available on HUB in the Academic registry section (Found via Help&Support). You should include a completed copy of the Assignment Cover sheet. Any submission withoutthis completed Assignment Cover sheet may be considered invalid and not marked. 2. Assessment BriefThis module is assessed through one graded element worth 100%. You must achieve at least50% to pass this module.For this assignment you have to build a Project Management Consultancy Report based on theSmart City OS case study.THE SMART CITY OS CASE STUDYHull’s journey to becoming a programmable cityHere’s how Hull is racing to become the UK’s first smart city.For a city to become smart, it takes a combination of technologies and disciplines, seamlesslyintegrated, with an understanding of how a huge number of customers – the population of yourcity – with interact with it. In the UK, several cities are racing to become the nation’s smartestcity, from London to Manchester to the country’s current leader, Bristol.Against those larger cities, Hull might seem like the underdog, but it’s been making considerablein-roads over the past 12 months or so. In May last year, it was awarded £55,000 for smartsolutions to reduce traffic congestion. Later in the year, it started a more ambitious project – tocreate a purpose-built, smart operating system (OS) for the city.The project, Smart City OS is being delivered by Hull City Council, technology company Connexinand Cisco. Connexin has been working with cities such as Newcastle Upon Tyne to deliver smartcity technologies, impacting on everything from lighting, mobility, security and waste.“Developing Hull as a Smart City will give us the opportunity to work with public and privatesector partners to deliver real benefits to communities, businesses and visitors to Hull,” saysCouncillor Daren Hale, Deputy Leader of Hull City Council.The objectivesHull has been quietly upgrading itself over the past five years. Its small size – with a populationof around 260,000 – has allowed it to make changes at a comparatively quick pace. This hasallowed Hull to become the UK’s first full-fibre city – it has the fastest broadband of anywhere inthe UK, according to broadband choices.Hull City Council had already worked with Connexin on a long-range wide area network(LoRaWAN), allowing for better business connectivity and the facility of Internet of Thingsdevices. Creating its own OS seemed the next logical step.The aim of the project is to increase and enhance data sharing and decision-making, allowing theCouncil to deliver more effective services across the board, from traffic management to healthand social care.“The system pulls together information that currently sits within separate council computersystems to enable city-wide management of the city’s public assets in real-time using state-ofthe-art technology, says Hale. “Residents will receive better information to make choices abouttransport, traffic and parking. But this will be just the beginning of what is possible.”Over the course of the project, it will drive new demand for a digitally skilled workforce, whichwill then boost Hull’s economy. The Council is investing in skills for its young people as a result.The methodologyThe OS uses Connexin tech, built on Cisco Kinetic for Cities platform. It will pull together 12separate council IT systems. Each system will process data from a variety of sources, includingcity-wide sensors and Internet of Things devices. This data can be used to help facilitate variousservices. Connexin, with its experience in implementing smart city solutions, is taking a five-stepprocess to the installation.The first step is infrastructure: having the right level of area-wide connectivity to be able todeliver smart city services. This is a combination of high-speed fibre networks and LoRaWANnetworks. Hull had a head start in this area – local telecoms company KCOM had invested £85min the city’s full-fibre network, and Connexin’s LoRaWAN was already in place.Second is the installation of sensors across the city, to collect real-time data. This is where the 12systems come in. Connexin’s Smart Bins is one of them. The others include the Siemens Stratosplatform for traffic management; the Bartec Auto ID system for managing waste; and the Datekstreetlighting system.The Vaisala IceCast program will help to predict the weather and plan road maintenance. TheTeletrac Navman provides GPS technology, and the Citilogik system will monitor peoplemovement. Pitney Bowes is providing asset-management software for street furniture.Elsewhere, Defra’s air-quality database, the Environment Agency’s flood monitoring platform,Hydro-Logic flooding alert sensors and the Astun iShare GIS web mapping portal – provide therest of the data.Stage three is the implementation of the platform and bringing all of the systems onto the OS.This is expected to take around a year. This allows for stage four – gathering insights. Stage fiveis about determining outcomes based on those insights.“Our platform will enable Hull to become a “programmable city” and move from outdated siloedservice driven technologies to a central platform to improve service delivery, reduce costs and tomake the most of new technologies such as IoT, AI and machine learning algorithms,” saysFurqan Alamgir, Founder and CEO of Connexin.Engaging the public and managing stakeholdersWhile the data will be used by Hull City Council to improve its services across the board, the aimis to provide insights to businesses and the public too. As the systems are integrated with theOS, they will be exposed to Hull’s business and private residents. This, it is hoped, will encouragestart-ups to create new technologies that the city can then pull into its Smart City OS.“For us, it is not just about smart cities,” says Mike Kenworthy, assistant director of digital andICT for Hull City Council, who is managing the project. “We are looking at utilising IoT and data –that we potentially collect from other sources as well – to find innovative approaches to anyproblem.”One of the biggest challenges for the project is managing the stakeholders, who are spreadacross various departments within the council, plus other organisations such as Humberside Fireand Rescue Service, and the University of Hull.Hull City Council is taking a ‘one council’ approach to managing it all. People see the council as‘the council’ not as a series of separate services. Constant engagement with stakeholders acrossall service sectors is crucial.The end resultDue to its size, strong digital infrastructure, and lessons learned from other smart city projects,Hull City Council has been able to skip the pilot phase and roll out Smart City OS across the city.This could potentially cause Hull to leap up the UK smart city league tables.Hale and Kenworthy are confident that it will bring considerable economic benefits to theregion, making the city particularly attractive to tech firms. While the council has a loftyambition to make Hull the world’s smartest city, the objective is primarily to benefit the peopleof the city. “We do not want to be a smart city because it is cool,” says Kenworthy. “We have tobe sure that what we are doing is for the benefit of the city.”Source: Association of Project Management (APM)Link: https://www.apm.org.uk/resources/find-a-resource/case-studies/case-study-smart-city-oshull-s-journey-to-becoming-a-programmable-city/- accessed 5/10/20It is recommended that you should also conduct your own independent research to strengthenyour knowledge of this project.END OF CASE STUDYTHE SMART CITY OS CONSULTANCY REPORTIn the role of a Project Consultant, you are required to develop a project report for the Smart City OSproject by leveraging on the techniques and concepts you have covered in the module.The report has to include the following tasks: Task 1 – The Project Manager (12 Marks)Critically discuss what skills the project manager of the Smart City OS project needs to developto be effective and reflect on possible actions the project manager of the Smart City OS projectshould take to develop those skills. Support your arguments with academic literature andreferences to other similar real projects. Task 2 – Problem Solving & Decision Making (12 Marks)Identify relevant stakeholders and create a stakeholder influence map for the Smart City OSproject and discuss why these are the most critical stakeholders emerging from your analysis.Afterwards, by leveraging on the academic literature and similar real projects, critically discusshow you engage the stakeholders you have identified with the Smart City OS project. Task 3 – The Project Triangle (12 Marks)Critically discuss the importance of the various project triangle parameters that will need to bemanaged by the Smart City OS project manager over the course of the project, and how theymay inter-relate to each other. Discuss the impact of possible changes to this project. Supportyour arguments with academic literature and references to other similar real projects. Task 4 – Managing Finances (12 Marks)Provide advice to the project manager on what resources may be required for this project andwhat could be an effective cost estimation technique for the Smart City OS project and explainwhy. Support your arguments with academic literature and references to other similar realprojects. Task 5 – Risk Management within the Project (12 Marks)Develop a risk analysis by constructing a risk register for the Smart City OS project. You shouldidentify at least ten risks that the Smart City OS project should be aware of by using theappropriate categories (e.g., environmental, operational, financial, strategic, reputational,compliance, etc…). For this analysis, an appropriate risk register format should be used. Task 6 – Conflicts and Negotiation (12 Marks)Identify at least six conflicts that may arise when running the Smart City OS project and theirsources. Once you have identified those potential conflicts, critically discuss which actions canbe taken by the project manager to resolve them and suggest appropriate conflict managementand/or negotiation strategies to address these. Support your arguments with academicliterature and references to other similar real projects. Task 7 – Teamwork (12 Marks)Critically discuss what the project manager can do to build a highly successful team for the SmartCity OS project. In particular, focus on the importance of how a diverse team can increaseproject performance., Critically reflect on what actions the project manager can take to build adiverse team for the Smart City OS project, and what are some of the challenges of working indiverse teams. Presentation and Structure (10 Marks) Assessment Self-Evaluation (6 Marks)You must self-evaluate each single task of your report by using the rubric provided in themarking guide and attach it to your report. The template for this can be found in the markingguide section.Word count: 5000 wordsYour report structure should include the following sections:Cover page (University cover sheet)Table of ContentsList of Abbreviations (if appropriate)IntroductionTask 1 – The Project ManagerTask 2 – Problem Solving & Decision MakingTask 3 – The Project TriangleTask 4 – Managing FinancesTask 5 – Risk Management within the ProjectTask 6 – Conflicts and NegotiationTask 7 – TeamworkConcluding remarksReferencesAssessment Self-EvaluationAppendix (if appropriate)Word count – only applies to the main body (shown in bold); i.e., cover page, table of content, list ofabbreviations, references, assessment self-evaluation and appendix are not part of the 5000-wordcount.If you have any further questions about this coursework assignment, please contact the moduleleader or the tutor.Tip for Mapping the Assessment towards Module Topics and ModuleLearning Outcomes (LOs) Assessment TaskModule TopicMarksModule LOsTask 1 – The Project ManagerThe Project Manager12Critically evaluate how project managementbehaviours can promote organisational success.Task 2 – Problem Solving andDecision MakingProblem Solving andDecision Making12Strategically apply relevant project managementpractices within organisationsTask 3 – Project TriangleThe Project Triangle12Critically appraise project management principlesand environmental contexts in which projects can bedelivered.Task 4 – Managing FinancesManaging Finances12Critically appraise project management principlesand environmental contexts in which projects can bedelivered.Task 5 – Risk ManagementWithin the ProjectRisk ManagementWithin a Project12Critically appraise project management principlesand environmental contexts in which projects can bedelivered.Task 6 – Conflicts andNegotiationConflicts andNegotiation12Strategically apply relevant project managementpractices within organisationsTask 7 – TeamworkTeamwork12Critically evaluate how project managementbehaviours can promote organisational success.Presentation and Structure10Assessment Self-Evaluation6Total100 3. Marking Guide (Student Version) Highlight in the rubric what level you believe you have met each task (fail, pass, merit, distinction)AssignmenttaskMarkDistinctionMeritPassFailExplain why you feel youhave met the task to thelevel you indicate (notpart of maximum wordsubmission)The ProjectManager12Critical discussion of the key skillsneeded by the project manager forrunning the project and how todevelop these skills.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in the moduleand is applying them to the casestudy.Discussion is supported by strongevidence from academic literatureand by the comparison with atleast one other similar real project.Good discussion of the keyskills needed by the projectmanager for running theproject and how to developthese skills.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in themodule and is applyingthem to the case study.Discussion is supported bysolid evidence fromacademic literature.Basic discussion of the keyskills needed by the projectmanager for running theproject and how to developthese skills.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in themodule and is applyingthem to the case study.Discussion is supported bysome basic evidence fromacademic literature.No critical discussion.No leverage on theconcepts presented in themodule.No application of themodule concepts to thecase study.Problem Solvingand DecisionMaking12Detailed stakeholders influencemap, critical discussion of theprojects’ key stakeholders and ofthe stakeholder engagementtechniques that can be adopted bythe project manager.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in the moduleand is applying them to the casestudy.Good stakeholdersinfluence map, gooddiscussion of the projects’key stakeholders and of thestakeholder engagementtechniques that can beadopted by the projectmanager.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in theBasic stakeholdersinfluence map, basicdiscussion of the projects’key stakeholders and of thestakeholder engagementtechniques that can beadopted by the projectmanager.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in theNo critical discussion.No leverage on theconcepts presented in themodule.No application of themodule concepts to thecase study. Discussion is supported by strongevidence from academic literatureand by the comparison with atleast one other similar real project.module and is applyingthem to the case study.Discussion is supported bysolid evidence fromacademic literature.module and is applyingthem to the case study.Discussion is supported bysome basic evidence fromacademic literature.Project Triangle12Critical discussion of theimportance of the project triangleparameters and their interrelation.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in the moduleand is applying them to the casestudy.Discussion is supported by strongevidence from academic literatureand by the comparison with atleast one other similar real project.Good discussion of theimportance of the projecttriangle parameters andtheir interrelation.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in themodule and is applyingthem to the case study.Discussion is supported bysolid evidence fromacademic literature.Basic discussion of theimportance of the projecttriangle parameters andtheir interrelation.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in themodule and is applyingthem to the case study.Discussion is supported bysome basic evidence fromacademic literature.No critical discussion.No leverage on theconcepts presented in themodule.No application of themodule concepts to thecase studyManagingFinances12Critical discussion and justificationof what can be the cost estimationapproach appropriate for the casestudy.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in the moduleand is applying them to the casestudy.Discussion is supported by strongevidence from academic literatureand by the comparison with atleast one other similar real project.Good discussion andjustification of what can bethe cost estimationapproach appropriate forthe case study.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in themodule and is applyingthem to the case study.Discussion is supported bysolid evidence fromacademic literature.Basic discussion andjustification of what can bethe cost estimationapproach appropriate forthe case study.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in themodule and is applyingthem to the case study.Discussion is supported bysome basic evidence fromacademic literature.No critical discussion andjustification.No leverage on theconcepts presented in themodule.No application of themodule concepts to thecase study. RiskManagementwithin theProject12Detailed presentation of at least10 risks.Risk register used.Identified risks are specific to thecase study and leverage on the riskcategories seen in the moduleGood presentationpresentation of at least 10risks.Risk register used.Identified risks are specificto the case study andleverage on the riskcategories seen in themoduleBasic presentation of atleast 10 risks.Risk register used.Identified risks are specificto the case study andleverage on the riskcategories seen in themoduleLess than ten risksidentified.No use of the risk register.No use of risk categoriesseen in the moduleNo leverage on theconcepts presented in themodule.No application of themodule concepts to thecase studyConflicts andNegotiation12Detailed presentation of at leastsix conflicts and their sources.Critical discussion of actions thatcan be taken to resolve thoseconflicts.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in the moduleand is applying them to the casestudy.Discussion is supported by strongevidence from academic literatureand by the comparison with atleast one other similar real project.Good presentation of atleast six conflicts and theirsources. Good discussion ofactions that can be taken toresolve those conflicts.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in themodule and is applyingthem to the case study.Discussion is supported bysolid evidence fromacademic literature.Basic presentation of atleast six conflicts and theirsources. Basic discussion ofactions that can be taken toresolve those conflicts.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in themodule and is applyingthem to the case study.Discussion is supported bysome basic evidence fromacademic literature.Less than six conflictsidentified, and source ofthe conflicts not specified.No conflict managementtechniques/negotiationstrategies presented.No leverage on theconcepts presented in themodule.No application of themodule concepts to thecase studyTeamwork12Detailed discussion of what can bedone to build highly successfulteams, diverse teams and thechallenges of working in diverseteams.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in the moduleand is applying them to the casestudy.Discussion is supported by strongevidence from academic literatureGood discussion of whatcan be done to build highlysuccessful teams, diverseteams and the challenges ofworking in diverse teams.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in themodule and is applyingthem to the case study.Basic discussion of whatcan be done to build highlysuccessful teams, diverseteams and the challenges ofworking in diverse teams.Student is leveraging on theconcepts presented in themodule and is applyingthem to the case study.No critical discussion.No leverage on theconcepts presented in themodule.No application of themodule concepts to thecase study and by the comparison with atleast one other similar real project.Discussion is supported bysolid evidence fromacademic literature.Discussion is supported bysome basic evidence fromacademic literature.Presentationand ReferencingPresentation(5 marks)Referencing(5 marks)10For a distinction the report will usea consistent approach to headings,tables and graphs. Sources will becorrectly cited and there will be acomplete set of references in thecorrect format and in alphabeticalorder. There is evidence ofextensive independent readingand research. Formatting andpresentation is professionalthroughout.Referencing has few if anyerrors. The report isreasonably well presentedbut could be improved bygreater attention to detail.There is evidence of widerreading and research.There is a limited numberof references, but thecorrect format is used,albeit with some errors.There may be some errorsin formatting andpresentation, but thereport is reasonablyprofessional in appearance.References areinappropriate, irrelevantand/or incorrectlyformatted. The referencesthemselves suggest theyhave simply been copiedfrom another sourcewithout accessing thematerial by the student.AssessmentSelf-Evaluation6Student has highlighted which level she/he believes have met each task and provided a basicexplanation.No self-evaluation.No explanation.Total100 5. Appendix A – General Grading Criteria (Level 7) CriteriaPass GradesReferral/Fail GradesHigh Distinction85-100%Distinction70-84%Merit60-69%Pass50-59%Referral/Fail30-49%Referral/Low Fail0-29%The work displays:The work displays:The work displays:The work displays:The work displays:The work displays:Knowledge &Understanding(a) SystematicUnderstanding(b) EmergingThought(a) Strong evidence ofa comprehensive andsystematicunderstanding of anextensive range ofappropriate issues,concepts, theories andresearch(a) Clear evidence of acomprehensive andsystematicunderstanding of aconsiderable variety ofissues, concepts,theories and research(a) Clear evidence of acomprehensive andsystematicunderstanding of allmajor – and someminor – issues,concepts, theories andresearch(a) Evidence of asystematicunderstanding, whichmay contain somegaps, of all major –and some minor –issues, concepts,theories and research(a) Evidence of anunderstanding of anappropriate range ofissues, concepts,theories and researchbut has significantgaps ormisunderstandings.(a) Evidence of alimitedunderstanding ofissues, concepts,theories andresearch either majorand/or minor.(b) Sustainedexcellence in theapplication ofthoughts and practicesat the forefront of thediscipline(b) Precise and welljudged application ofthoughts and practicesat the forefront of thediscipline(b) Some clearevidence of theapplication of thoughtsand practices at theforefront of thediscipline(b) Clear evidence ofan understanding ofthoughts andpractices at theforefront of thediscipline.(b) Unclear orimpreciseunderstanding ofthoughts and practicesat the forefront of thediscipline.(b) Significant gaps inthe understanding ofthe debates at theforefront of thediscipline.Argument(a) Analysis,Synthesis &Evaluation(b) NumericalAnalysis(c)Argumentation(d) IndependentResearch(a) Consistentlyprecise, accurate andreasoned analysis,synthesis and/orevaluation; addressingissues with insight ororiginality(a) Consistently precise,accurate and reasonedanalysis, synthesisand/or evaluationaddressing all issues,some with creativity(a) Precision, accuracyand clear reasoningthroughout theanalysis, synthesisand/or evaluationaddressing all issuesappropriately(a) Broad levels ofprecision, accuracyand reasoning inanalysis, synthesisand/or evaluation,and addresses all keyissues(a) Errors which affectthe consistency of theanalysis, synthesis orevaluation and/or keygaps in the issuesaddressed(a) A lack ofprecision, accuracyor reasoning inanalysis, synthesis orevaluation withsignificant gaps inthe issues addressed(b) Numeric analysisthat is complete andfree from errors with(b) Numeric analysisthat is complete andmostly free from errors(b) Numeric analysisthat is complete andmostly free from errors(b) Numeric analysisthat is mostlycomplete and free(b) Numeric analysisthat is mostlycomplete but contains(b) Numeric analysisthat is incomplete orcontains errors which application ofmethods that may beinsightful or originalwith fluent andappropriate applicationof methods.with relevant andeffective application ofmethods.from significant orcritical errors withappropriateapplication ofmethods.errors with significanteffect, or methodsthat are appliedinappropriatelyhave critical effect,or methods that areappliedinappropriately(c) Extremely strongand consistentargument making aconvincing whole withevidence of originality.Impressive dexterity inthe use of informationgathered to supportthe argument.(c) Extremely strong andconsistent argumentthat convincinglyaddresses issuesincluding uncertaintiesand conflicts. Excellentuse of informationgathered which tosupport and further theargument(c) Evidence of anargument that isgenerally convincingwith a good internalconsistency andaddresses most issues.Very good use ofinformation gatheredto support theargument.(c) Evidence of anoverall convincingargument but mayhave weaknesses,gaps orinconsistencies. Clearuse of informationgathered but mayhave someweaknesses in theintegration into theargument.(c) Evidence of aconsistent argumentbut may haveweaknesses,significant gaps or beunconvincing. Clearuse of informationgathered but may notbe sufficient to sustainthe argument.(c) Lack ofconsistency orstructure in theargument. Seriousweaknesses in theintegration ofevidence and/or noawareness of thelimitations orweaknesses of theresearch.Argument(continued)(d) IndependentResearch(d) Evidence of aninnovative or originaluse of extensivepersonal researchwhich has beenthoroughly criticallyevaluated bothconceptually andmethodologically(d) Substantial researchand evidence of aninnovative use of a widerange of personalresearch with clear andconsistent criticalevaluation bothconceptually andmethodologically(d) Clear evidence ofconsiderable personalresearch and the use ofa diverse range ofappropriate sourcesbut may containproblems withconsistency in theconceptual andmethodological criticalevaluation(d) Appropriate use ofa wide range ofpersonal researchwhich is criticallyevaluated for keyconceptual andmethodological issuesalthough this may notbe consistentthroughout(d) Evidence of a rangeof personal researchbut evidence ofmethodological orconceptual evaluationmay be limited,inconsistent orinappropriate(d) Over reliance onvery restricted rangeof personal orsecondary researchmuch of which maynot be evaluated andmay not be directlyrelated to thequestion or area Presentation(a) Structure(b) Referencing(c) Use ofLanguage(a) Excellent structureand presentation(a) Excellent structureand presentation(a) Good structure andpresentation(a) Adequatestructure andpresentation(a) Adequate structureand presentation(a) Poor structureand presentation(b) Precise, full andappropriate referencesand notes.(b) Precise, full andappropriate referencesand notes.(b) Full and appropriatereferences and noteswith minor orinsignificant errors(b) Good referencesand notes with minoror insignificant errorsor omissions(b) Competentreferences and notesbut may containinconsistencies, errorsor omissions(b) Poor referencesand notes withmultipleinconsistencies,errors or omissions(c) Subtle use oflanguage expressinghighly nuancedthought with clarityand precision to a levelappropriate forsubmission forpublication.(c) Precise use oflanguage expressingcomplex thought withclarity, accuracy andprecision which furthersand enhances theargument(c) Clear and preciseuse of languageallowing a complexargument to be easilyunderstood andfollowed(c) Generally clear useof language sufficientfor arguments to bereadily understoodand followed(c) Generallyunderstandable use oflanguage butsignificant errors inexpression affectingoverall clarity(c) Serious errors inthe use of languagewhich makesmeaning unclear orimprecise

QUALITY: 100% ORIGINAL PAPER – NO PLAGIARISM – CUSTOM PAPER

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *