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Svend HollensenGLOBAL MARKETING5th EditionHollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011International Marketing ResearchSlide 5.2Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011Learning objectives Discuss the key problems in gathering and usinginternational market data Distinguish between different research approaches,data sources and data types Link global marketing research to the decisionmaking process Understand the relevance of the Web as an importantdata source in global marketing researchSlide 5.3Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011Slide 5.4Categorisation of data for assessment of market potential Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011 5-4Slide 5.5Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011The Importance of IMR Provides the necessary information to avoidcostly mistakes due to:complexity of the international marketextreme differences among countrieslack of familiarity with foreign markets Acknowledges differences in:market research facilitiesthe criteria for assessing products or servicesproduct usageSlide 5.6Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011CountryArgentinaBermudaCanadaCongoDenmarkGermanyIndiaKenyaKuwaitNigeriaNorwaySingaporeUSADefinition of UrbanLocalities of 400 or more inhabitantsEntire CountryAreas with 1,000 or more inhabitantsLocalities of 5,000 or more inhabitantsLocalities of 200 or more inhabitantsLocalities of 2,000 or more inhabitantsLocalities of 7,000 or more inhabitantsAgglomerations of at leas 2,000 inhabitantsLocalities of 10,000 or more inhabitantsLocalities of 20,000 or more inhabitantsLocalities of 200 or more inhabitantsEntire CountryUrbanized areas or places of 2,500 or more inhabitantsDEFINITIONS OF URBAN, BY COUNTRYSlide 5.7Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011International cross-cultural comparisonSource: M. Javidan, P. Dorman, M. de Luque and R. House, ‘In the eye of the beholder: cross-cultural lessons in leadership from Project GLOBE’, Academy of ManagementPerspectives (February 2006), pp. 67–90 ( Figure 4: USA vs China, p. 82 ). (GLOBE stands for ‘Global Leadership and Organisational Behaviour Effectiveness’.)Slide 5.8Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011CHALLENGES IN PLANNING IMR complexity of research design lack of secondary data costs of collecting primary data coordination of research and data collectionacross countries establishing comparability and equivalenceSlide 5.9Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011EQUIVALENCEMEASUREMENTAre thephenomena incountries X, Y,and Z measure inthe same way?CONSTRUCTAre we studyingthe samephenomena incountries X, Y,and Z?SAMPLINGAre the samplesused in countriesX, Y, and Zequivalent?TYPES OF EQUIVALENCESSlide 5.10Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011What is this?What term is used to refer to thetechnique which uses time-series datafrom one country to project sales inother countries?Lead-lag analysisSlide 5.11Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011Lead-lag analysis of penetration of DVDsSlide 5.12Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011What is this?What term is used to refer to the techniquefor estimating demand in another countrymarket based on a single-factor index with acorrelation value between a factor anddemand for a product that is obtained in onecountry and applied to a target internationalmarket?Estimation by analogySlide 5.13Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011Estimation by analogy – an exampleSlide 5.14Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011➢ direct marketing efforts : more than 3 times the averageresponse rate as compared to the US; the society’s conceptof individuality➢ is considered as a motivating element for consumerpreference for direct mail➢ the distribution system is similar to the US andapproachability to the consumer is equally effective➢ mailing lists have grown exponentially in recent years➢ availability of detailed sources of secondary data forconducting preliminary research➢ not a very popular survey method: telephone interviews➢ despite its homogenous appearance, the UK is a highlydiverse countryMarket Research in United KingdomSlide 5.15Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011Conducting primary research inthe Middle East❖ mainly: observation and sample surveys❖ not terribly effective:focus groups and door-to-door interviewing❖ sanction from authorities required❖ many different dialects; translating verbal and nonverbal cues important❖ high percentage of foreignersSlide 5.16Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011requires a thorough analysis of the each countrythe polarisation that exists in the continent makes the following difficult:actual research analysis and interpretationapplicabilitystandardised strategies will not be effective on thiscontinentConducting Research in AfricaSlide 5.17Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011Market Research in Chinathe language tends to impede a consistent transposing ofstrategies (important to have good translators)problems:very little MR data available for the countrythe size of the markethigh level of bureaucracytelecommunication penetration is small ( ~7% vs. 95% USA)popular qualitative research methods: focus groups & semistru./in-depth interviewingpopular quantitative methods: probability sampling & quotasampling using face-to-face interviews, in-home placementstudiesChinese do not immediately respond to questionnairesMost commonly used sampling method:random probability samplingSlide 5.18Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011➢ biggest problem: accuracy & reliability lacking in MR studies➢ other problems:➢ telephone (the infrastructure is not adequate & expensive to construct➢ or develop)➢ the Internet as a tool in MR – not significantly impacted India➢ mail surveys: the size of the population➢ the lack of good consumer databases➢ The role of MR as a tool in determining the feasibility of productinnovations & applications has been on an increase➢ Businesses in India do not recognise the integral role of MR &believe that it is a cost best not undertaken➢ the Indian market is a sellers’ market, hence it is difficult toconduct MRMarket Research in IndiaSlide 5.19Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011the business community = highly educated and a significantportion of the population is well-versed in English and well asother foreign languagesthe largest telecommunication sector in all of Lat Am.growth of mail order catalogues (ex. Sears Roebuck andJCPenny) indicate the use of mail as a good survey toolThe government has monopoly in the provision of telephone,telegraph, data transmission and other “public services”although it has an installed base of 10.63 million telephones(42nd in the world), service congestion has been worseningMarket Research in BrazilSlide 5.20Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011popular data collection methods:• door-to-door interview• telephone & internet (increasing)growing reliance on qualitative means of measurement vs thequantitative; companies rely on the provision of value-addedservices by MR firms.several Japanese companies are looking at cost efficiency as amain prerogative in determining the kind of survey researchmethod to employsometimes managers are unwilling to discuss their company ortheir employees because of the space constraint in Japaneseoffices which forces them to work in cubiclesMarket Research in JapanSlide 5.21Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011Market Research in Australia highly urbanised (85% live in cities, majority live in the S) most effective MR: telephone and mail postal questionnaires are not popular media research is available for all media sources andthis includes meter measurement of TV audiences high news awareness Random Sampling is considered most suitable since thereis immense cultural diversity in the Australian market.(Source: Kumar)Slide 5.22Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011➢ has the second largest direct mail market in Europe➢ very established and updated infrastructure systemthat supports its direct marketing ventures➢ preferred data gathering methods: face to faceinterviews➢ telemarketing – a booming area that foreign firm canopt for.➢ the best way of conducting personal interviews: mallinterceptsMarket Research in FranceSlide 5.23Hollensen: Global Marketing, 5th Edition, © Pearson Education Limited 2011+ availability of good secondary research information enables athorough analysis of the consumer perspectives– responding to surveys at malls or in answering queries overthe telephone– Germans are intensely private and tend to keep their opinionsto themselves– homogenisation of marketing strategy is not a good idea forthis countrythe one misnomer that marketers have in targeting consumersin Germany is in assuming that most of them live in urbanareasMarket Research in Germany

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