300922 Quality Assurance and Food Analysis | My Assignment Tutor

School of Science300922 Quality Assurance and Food AnalysisAutumn 2021Edition: Autumn 2021Copyright ©2021 University Western Sydney trading as Western Sydney University ABN 53 014 069 881 CRICOS Provider No: 00917K No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the prior written permission from the Dean of the School. Copyright for acknowledged materials reproducedherein is retained by the copyright holder. All readings in this publication are copied under licence in accordance with Part VB of the Copyright Act 1968.Unit Details Unit Code:300922Unit Name:Quality Assurance and Food AnalysisCredit Points:10Unit Level:3Assumed Knowledge:Students require good understanding of the principles of food preservation and HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point). Note: Students with any problems, concerns or doubts should discuss those with the Unit Coordinator as early as they can.Unit Coordinator Name:Phone:Dr Rosalie Durham(02) 4570 1754Location: Hawkesbury Campus, M15.G.56Email:[email protected] Arrangement:Meetings by appointmentName:Phone:Dr Sunil Panchal(02) 4570 1932Location: Hawkesbury Campus, M15.G.56Email:[email protected] Consultation Arrangement:Meetings by appointmentTeaching Team Name:Melanie AllanLocation: Hawkesbury CampusEmail:[email protected] Note: The relevant Learning Guide Companion supplements this documentContents1 About Quality Assurance and Food Analysis 21.1 An Introduction to this Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.2 What is Expected of You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.3 Changes to Unit as a Result of Past Student Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Assessment Information 42.1 Unit Learning Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42.2 Approach to Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42.3 Assessment Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52.4 Assessment Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62.4.1 Online and in-class quizzes: Multiple choice and short answer, each quiz worth 5% . . . . . . 62.4.2 Food additive risk assessment: Research task;Individual report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82.4.3 Laboratory report: Chemical analysis of a food product; Individual report . . . . . . . . . . . 142.4.4 Quality Manual: Application of a quality standard (eg. ISO22000) to a food process; Professional Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202.5 General Submission Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Teaching and Learning Activities 274 Learning Resources 294.1 Recommended Readings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2911 About Quality Assurance and Food Analysis1.1 An Introduction to this UnitThis unit covers the knowledge and tools required to maintain food quality. Students will develop an awarenessof food laws, regulations and codes at the state, national and international levels. Students will be introduced toelementary toxicology and risk analysis as it applies to the regulation of food additives. The unit also integratesprevious studies in HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) to develop deeper understanding of food qualityassurance and quality management systems as they are applied to the control and management of the food supply.Students are introduced to the standard methods of analysis of foods as used for nutritional and quality assessment offoods. Practicals include determination of major and minor food components; functionality tests and sensory analysisof foods.1.2 What is Expected of YouStudy LoadA student is expected to study an hour per credit point a week. For example a 10 credit point Unit would require 10hours of study per week. This time includes the time spent within classes during lectures, tutorials or practicals.AttendanceIt is strongly recommended that students attend all scheduled learning activities to support their learning.Online Learning RequirementsUnit materials will be made available on the Unit’s vUWS (E-Learning) site (https://vuws.westernsydney.edu.au/).You are expected to consult vUWS at least twice a week, as all Unit announcements will be made via vUWS. Teachingand learning materials will be regularly updated and posted online by the teaching team.Special RequirementsEssential Equipment:Students are required to have Personal Protection Equipment for attendance at practical, ie. Laboratory coat, safetygoggles, enclosed shoes.Legislative Pre-Requisites:NonePolicies Related to Teaching and LearningThe University has a number of policies that relate to teaching and learning. Important policies affecting studentsinclude:– Assessment Policy– Bullying Prevention Policy and– Guidelines– Enrolment Policy– Examinations Policy– Review of Grade Policy– Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy– Special Consideration Policy– Student Misconduct Rule2– Teaching and Learning – Fundamental Code– Student Code of ConductAcademic Integrity and Student Misconduct RuleIn submitting assessments, it is essential that you are familiar with the policies listed above and that you understandthe principles of academic integrity. You are expected to act honestly and ethically in the production of all academicwork and assessment tasks, submit work that is your own and acknowledge any contribution to your work made byothers.Important information about academic integrity, including advice to students is available at https://www.westernsydney.edu.au/studysmart/home/academic_integrity_and_plagiarism. It is your responsibility to familiarise yourself withthese principles and apply them to all work submitted to the University as your own.When you submit an assignment or product, you will declare that no part has been: copied from any other student’s work or from any other source except where due acknowledgement is made in the assignment; submitted byyou in another (previous or current) assessment, except where appropriately referenced, and with prior permissionfrom the Unit Coordinator; written/produced for you by any other person except where collaboration has been authorised by the Unit Coordinator.The Student Misconduct Rule applies to all students of Western Sydney University and makes it an offence forany student to engage in academic, research or general misconduct as defined in the Rule.The University considers plagiarism, cheating and collusion as instances of academic misconduct. The Universityalso considers submitting falsified documentation in support of applications for special consideration, including sittingof deferred examinations, as instances of general misconduct. You should be aware that changes were made to theStudent Misconduct Rule commencing 1 January 2020 that provide for minimum sanctions that apply to certainconduct, including the provision of falsified documentation to the University.You are strongly advised to read the Student Misconduct Rule and the Inappropriate Behaviour Guidelines at thecommencement of each session to familiarise yourself with this process and the expectations of the University inrelation to work submitted for assessment.1.3 Changes to Unit as a Result of Past Student FeedbackThe University values student feedback in order to improve the quality of its educational programs. The feedbackprovided helps us improve teaching methods and Units of study. The survey results inform Unit content and design,learning guides, teaching methods, assessment processes and teaching materials.You are welcome to provide feedback that is related to the teaching of this Unit. At the end of the semester you willbe given the opportunity to complete a Student Feedback on Unit (SFU) questionnaire to assess the Unit. You mayalso have the opportunity to complete a Student Feedback on Teaching (SFT) questionnaire to provide feedback forindividual teaching staff.As a result of student feedback, the following changes and improvements to this subject have recently been made:– Student access will be provided to AFGC PIF (Product Information Form) by Bizcaps. This is a productspecification tool used throughout Australia by the food industry.– The Quality Manual assessment will be based the revised standard IS0 22000:2018 leading to changes inthe structure and content of the report. This new standard includes sections addressing external risks e.g.cybersecurity, food fraud, food defence and intentional contamination.– CODEX HACCP was updated in 2020, with amendments to the General Principles of Food Hygiene. CXC 1-1969. These changes will be incorporated into HACCP plans produced as part of the Quality Manual assessment32 Assessment Information2.1 Unit Learning OutcomesBecoming a professional in this field requires knowledge of the principles of food safety management, and foodregulations. This unit aims to develop and assure this set of knowledge and skills. Upon successfully completing thisunit, you should be able to: Outcome1Describe quality management theories and systems; food laws, regulations and codes at state, national andinternational levels2Use risk analysis methodology to evaluate the safety of a food additive, including gather and collateinformation from a wide range of sources and critique the information to assess the toxicological safety of afood additive3Work effectively in a group on a case study to produce a Quality Manual, integrating quality managementtheories, food safety regulations, and food process knowledge for the management of safe food4Apply quality management statistical tools to monitor the quality of a food process5Appraise and select appropriate methods for the chemical, physical and sensory analysis of foods6Follow laboratory procedures and protocols to proficiently perform a range of food analysis methods safelyand accurately; systematically record experimental data and calculate results of these tests7Demonstrate effective communication in a variety of written formats, scientific and professional; use ofadvanced word and excel skills for large and complex documents8Recognise the legal and ethical responsibility, both individual and corporate, to maintain a safe food supply 2.2 Approach to LearningThis unit is as much about learning theory, as active engagement in a range of learning activities about the principlesand methods for the management of food quality and safety. Learning is enhanced via interactive workshops,practicals, group-work and factory tours.Attendance at the weekly lecture sets the agenda for the week, while the workshop activities provides skills and supportfor deeper understanding for the application of this knowledge. Workshop activities include sensory evaluation, riskassessment, food analysis, labelling and quality management.Students normally do this unit in their final year after having completed the prerequisite unit Food Science 2, whichintroduced the methods for food preservation and HACCP principles needed to assure safe food processing. Studentsalso need a strong grounding in chemistry and microbiology to support understanding of elementary toxicology, foodquality and safety, and food analysis.This unit is taught alongside Culinary Science, whereby this unit provides knowledge and skills to conduct sensoryanalysis of food products. This unit is a prerequisite for ’Food Product Development’, whereby knowledge gainedin this unit enables students to safely and competently analyse (chemical, physical and sensory) a new product, andensure that the product complies with food safety and labelling regulations.This unit also articulates with Advanced Food Science and Technology, providing the skills necessary to conductresearch into food processes and to support understanding of the interactions between process variables, ingredientselection and storage conditions on food product quality.42.3 Assessment SummaryThe assessment items in this Unit are designed to enable you to demonstrate that you have achieved the Unitlearning outcomes. Completion and submission of all assessment items which have been designated as mandatory orcompulsory is essential to receive a passing grade.To pass this Unit you must:There are 4 assessment items in this unit. You must achieve at least 50% overall to pass this unit. ItemWeightDue DateULOs AssessedThresholdOnline and in-classquizzes: Multiple choiceand short answer, eachquiz worth 5%25%Week 4, 6, 8, 12, 141, 4, 5, 8NoFood additive riskassessment: Research task;Individual report25%16 April 20212, 7NoLaboratory report:Chemical analysis of a foodproduct; Individual report25%7 May 20215-7NoQuality Manual:Application of a qualitystandard (eg. ISO22000)to a food process;Professional Document25%8 June 20213, 7, 8No Feedback on AssessmentFeedback is an important part of the learning process that can improve your progress towards achieving the learningoutcomes. Feedback is any written or spoken response made in relation to academic work such as an assessmenttask, a performance or product. It can be given to you by a teacher, an external assessor or student peer, and maybe given individually or to a group of students. As a Western Sydney University student, it is your responsibility toseek out and act on feedback that is provided to you as a resource to further your learning.Assessments will be marked according to standard Western Sydney University Marking Criteria percentage range:Fail 0-49, Pass 50-64, Credit 65-74, Distinction 75-84, High Distinction 85-100Feedback for the assessments will be provided as follows:1. Online and in-class quizzes – on vUWS after the quiz completion deadline2. Food additive risk assessment – Turnitin feedback by 3 weeks after submission3. Laboratory report – Turnitin feedback by 3 weeks after submission4. Quality Manual – Group email of marked report by 3 weeks after submission52.4 Assessment Details2.4.1 Online and in-class quizzes: Multiple choice and short answer, each quiz worth 5% Weight:25%Type of Collaboration:IndividualDue:Week 4, 6, 8, 12, 14Submission:vUWS onlineFormat:Online quizzes include range of question types, including multiple choice, multipleanswer, ordering, matching and short answer written response.Length:5 x 20 minsCurriculum Mode:Quiz Online quizzes on weeks 4, 6, 8, 12, 14; open at 9am Wednesday morning and close at 11:59 PM on Friday night.Quiz 1 (value 5%)Week 4 online quiz, open: 24 – 26 MarThe senses, Sensory methods & statistics, Objective food methodsQuiz 2 (value 5%)Week 6 online quiz, open: 7 – 9 AprilFood regulations, Food Toxicology 1 & 2, Risk analysis & Risk managementQuiz 3 (value 5%)Week 8 online quiz, open: 21 – 23 AprilFood Analysis Intro, Water, Protein, Fat, Carbs, Minerals, Vitamins, Management of results dataQuiz 4 (value 5%)Week 12 online quiz, open: 19 – 21 MayLabelling (lecture & workshop), TQM theory, Six Sigma, Quality Manual Introduction,Quiz 5 (value 5%)Week 14 online quiz, open: 2 – 4 June;Documentation/ingredients, Auditing, TQM statistical tools (lecture & tutorial). Calculator required.Resources:Lecture notes, workshops and recommended readings6Marking Criteria: CriteriaHigh DistinctionDistinctionCreditPassUnsatisfactoryQuiz QuestionsAnswersdemonstrateoutstanding insight,originality ofthinking andreasoning, a criticalawareness of theprinciples andpractices of thesubject and a fullcomprehension ofthe assessmentrequirements.Learning outcomesare achieved farabove normalexpectations. Thereis almost no roomfor criticism.Answersdemonstrate clearinsight with originaland logical thinkingas well as very goodanalytical ability.Questions areansweredcomprehensivelyand contain nomajor flaws.Learning outcomesclearly achieved.Answers areessentially correctand well-reasonedand analysed butwith some minormisconceptionsand/or breadth ordepth of knowledge.There is obviousknowledge of thesubject and theintended learningoutcomes havemostly beenfulfilled.Competent butlargely descriptiveapproach in answersto writtenquestions.Adequate andsuffcient knowledgeof the principles,concepts and facts.Some major gaps inunderstanding.Generallysatisfactoryapplication ofroutine knowledge,limited criticaljudgement.Answers incorrectAnswers to writtenquestions too brief,contains excessiveirrelevantinformation.Argument orpresentation offacts is confusedand/or incomplete.Very little or noevidence thatlearning outcomeshave been achieved.Fundamental lackof knowledge,misunderstandingor misinterpretationof key concepts.Points poorlyargued or reasoned.Inadequate use ofcritical thinking,unfocusedreasoning, shallowand/or deficientunderstanding. 72.4.2 Food additive risk assessment: Research task;Individual report Weight:25%Type of Collaboration:IndividualDue:16 April 2021Submission:Turnitin – submitted as a single file by 11:59 PM on 16 April 2021. File title shouldinclude your SURNAME and ADDITIVE.Format:Written report on risk analysis of a selected food additive that is permitted in Australia.Length:1,800 wordsCurriculum Mode:Report Conduct a risk analysis of a selected food additive permitted in Australia.The task follows the protocol for risk analysis based on the following three actions:– Risk Assessment (hazard identification, hazard characterisation; exposure assessment; risk characterisation),– Risk Management (risk evaluation, option assessment and implementation),– Risk Communication.The taskThis assignment is about applying risk assessment theory and preparing a risk analysis report on a selected foodadditive. By doing this research task you will become familiar with:– Information on which the safety evaluation of food additives are based– Methods of risk assessment, including hazard characterisation and exposure assessment to reach a decision onsafety of a food ingredient– How to evaluate risk and determine the best options for the management of risk.The task will involve the following activities:– Gathering a wide range of literature, including the publications of CODEX Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committeeon Food Additives (JECFA), FSANZ Food Standards Code and Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS),– Characterisation of hazards associated with the additive, based on composition, manufacture and toxicologicalstudies (animal and human),– Calculation of the additive exposure to the population and sensitive individuals using TMDI and EDI calculations,– Application of critical thinking to assess the toxicological safety of the food additive to determine the level ofrisk to individuals and the population,– Evaluation of the level of risk and determine the most suitable management options for mitigating this risk.Attendance at the food additive workshop in week 2 is designed to assist you how to find the required informationrequired for this assessment task and how to do the required exposure calculations for TMDI and EDI. You will alsobe provided with a powerpoint summary for guidance on internet searches, recommended websites and how to do therequired calculations.Selection of food additiveThere will be a food additive survey available on vUWS, whereby you can rank your preferences for your additivebased on the following categories: Antioxidant, Colour (GMP or Max limit), Emulsifier, Preservative or Sweetener.Students will be randomly allocated an additive in their preferred category based on the list below on first-in basis.8Antioxidant – Ascorbyl palmitate, Butylated hydroxyanisole, Butylated hydroxytoluene, Octyl gallate, Propyl gallate.Colour GMP limit – Annatto extract, Caramel I, Cochineal/ carmines, Curcumin.Colour Max limit – Allura red AC, Azorubine/Carmoisine, Brilliant black BN, Brilliant blue FCF, Brown HT, Fastgreen FCF, Green S, Indigotine, Ponceau 4R, Quinoline yellow, Sunset yellow FCF, Tartrazine.Emulsifier – Dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate, Glycerol esters of wood rosins, Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids, Quillaiasaponins.Preservative – Benzoic acid, Calcium disodium EDTA, Ethyl lauroyl arginate, Nisin, Nitrates, Nitrites, Sorbic acid,Sulphur dioxide.Sweetener – Acesulfame potassium, Alitame, Aspartame, Cyclamates, Saccharin, Steviol glycosides, Sucralose.Exemplar:Risk analysis of a food additive1. Introduction (5/100 marks)Briefly introduce your additive, what is your additive and describe the objectives to conduct a toxicological evaluationstudy. (about a paragraph)2. Name and structure of ”your additive” (5/100 marks)Provide the Name, Synonyms, Classification numbers, Chemical structure for your additiveLaid out clearly3. Manufacture of ”additive” (5/100 marks)Describe method of manufacture or synthesis or purification of additive, raw materials & likely contaminates, appropriately summarised from literature.4. Specifications of ”additive” (5/100 marks)Chemical and Physical specifications of additive [These are the characteristics of the additive which specify a rangeof aspects, eg. formula weight, concentration, physical description (liquid, powder, colour, etc), solubility, moisturecontent, water insoluble matter, contaminates such as lead, etc. As provided by FAO or manufacturer of additive].Clearly laid out, table format if needed.5. Food uses and applications of ”additive” (10/100 marks)Describe the function of the additive in food and provide some typical food applications of the additive. Also discusswhether the activity of the additive is affected by the composition of the food or the treatment processes the foodundergoes, (eg. effect of pH, heat, oxygen exposure).6. Regulations and Australian standards pertaining to ”additive” (5/100 marks)Summarise the relevant information from the Australian FSANZ Food Standards Code. List relevant schedules anditem numbers, and describe clauses the additive is regulated under; provide a table listing the permitted levels of theadditive in different foods (cross ref with table used in TMDI calc).7. Toxicological assessment and Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) of ”additive” (20/100 marks)9Summarise some of the toxicological studies available on your additive, what are the findings; comment on relationshipbetween these studies on animals and human effects.Describe how the ADI was calculated for the additive, and what is the ADI for this additive.8. Theoretical Maximum Daily Intake (TMDI) calculation for ”additive” (10/100 marks)Calculate the Theoretical Maximum Daily Intake, based on mean intake using ABS food consumption data and FSANZFSC maximum allowance for each food, use excel spreadsheet for layout and calculations. Provide spreadsheet showingyour calculation9. Estimated Daily Intake (EDI) calculation for ”additive” (10/100 marks)Calculate the Estimated Daily Intake for a high risk individual, eating a typical diet at the high end of consumptionpatterns. Provide spreadsheet showing your calculation10. Risk analysis discussion and conclusion (20/100 marks)Assess and characterise the risk of your additive in the context of the Toxicological assessment and Exposure assessment of the additive. Discuss the TMDI and EDI results and compare to the ADI for the additive. Review theassumptions you made in the calculations of TMDI and EDI. Describe the high risk population groups. Which are thehigh risk foods? Reflect on the findings of the toxicological studies, what are the likely implications on the health andsafety of the consumers of this additive. Evaluate the risk and determine the best options for management of this risk.Provide evidence and integrate literature into your discussion to support your findings. Provide recommendationsand conclusions.11. References (5/100 marks)Information sourced from all references to be cited in-text, and correctly listed at the end of the report using Harvardstyle reference technique.Resources:1. Class activitiesLectures on weeks 1, 2, 3 & 4 on food toxicology and risk assessment methodologyFood Additive Workshop week 3 – Guidance on research for this assessment and how to do the required calculations.2. Literature search – Library e-resources, journals and booksSearch databases: ScienceDirect, CRCnetbase; Google Scholar3. Regulatory informationAustralian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) ABS Foods Eaten report http://www.abs.gov.au/Codex Alimentarius Commission http://www.fao.org/fao-who-codexalimentarius/en/Codex – JECFA – Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives https://www.who.int/foodsafety/areas_work/chemical-risks/jecfa/en/Codex – Chemical risks and JECFA http://www.fao.org/food/food-safety-quality/scientific-advice/jecfa/en/Food Standards Australia New Zealand – Food Standards Code https://www.foodstandards.gov.au/code/Pages/default.aspx4. Recomended TextsDeshpande, S. S. 2002. Handbook of Food Toxicology. Marcel Dekker, New York ISBN: 0824707605.Omaye, S. T. 2004. Food and Nutritional Toxicology. CRC Press, Boca Raton. ISBN:1587160714.10Marking Criteria: CriteriaHigh DistinctionDistinctionCreditPassUnsatisfactory1. Introduction(5%)Excellentintroduction.Comprehensivecovering all therequired topics.Excellent use ofrecommended plusadditional highquality references.Very well writtenintroduction.Comprehensivecovering all therequired topics.Good use of widerange ofrecommended texts.Good introduction,covering thepurpose of thereport, theobjectives & briefbackground to theadditive.Good use ofrecommended texts.Basically introducesthe purpose of thereport, theobjectives & briefbackground to theadditive. Theinformationprovided issometimesincomplete or toogeneral.Use ofrecommended texts.Poorly written,does not indicatethe purpose of thereport, theobjectives, nor briefbackground to theadditive. Little orno evidence ofrecommended texts;relies primarily onnon-reviewedinternet sources.2. Name &Structure(5%)All the keyinformationprovided.No errorsExcellent lay-out.All the keyinformationprovided.Minimal errorsWell laid out.All the keyinformationprovided.Slight errorsReasonable lay-out.Most of the keyinformationprovided.Maybe errors. Theinformationprovided issometimesincomplete or toogeneral.Large amounts ofmissinginformation.3. Manufacture(5%)Excellentdescription ofmethod ofmanufacture, likelycontaminants &associated risks.Excellent use ofrecommended andadditional highquality references.Comprehensivespecifications, allcorrect.Good use of widerange ofrecommended texts.Good description ofmethod ofmanufactureGood use ofrecommended texts.Most of the keyinformationprovided.Maybe errors inmethod ofmanufacture.Large amounts ofmissinginformation.Major errors inmethod ofmanufacture.4. Specifications(5%)Comprehensivespecifications, allcorrect.Excellent use ofrecommended andadditional highquality references.Comprehensivespecifications, allcorrect.Good use of widerange ofrecommended texts.Comprehensivespecifications,mostly correct.Good use ofrecommended texts.Most of the keyinformationprovided.Maybe errors in thespecifications.Large amounts ofmissinginformation.Major errors in thespecifications.5. FoodApplications(10%)Excellentdescription fooduses and effect offood & processingconditions onactivity.Comprehensive, allcorrect.Excellent use ofrecommended plusadditional highquality references.Very gooddescription fooduses and effect offood & processingconditions onactivity.Comprehensive allcorrect.Good use of widerange ofrecommended texts.Good descriptionfood uses and effectof food &processingconditions onactivityComprehensivemostly correct.Good use ofrecommended texts.Most of the keyinformationprovided.Maybe some errorsin food uses, orminimal review ofeffect of food &processingconditions onactivity.Large amounts ofmissinginformation.Major errors in fooduses, does notaddress the effect offood & processingconditions onactivity.6. FoodRegulations(5%)All of the keyinformationprovided, includingtable listingpermitted levels.Correctly writtencitation of therelevant standards& schedules, plusprovision ofinformation onGMP amounts ifneeded.All of the keyinformationprovided, includingtable listingpermitted levelsfrom the AustralianFSANZ standards..Citation of therelevant standards& schedules, plusprovision ofinformation onGMP amounts ifneeded.Almost all of thekey informationprovided, includingtable listingpermitted levelsfrom the AustralianFSANZ standards.Citation of therelevant standards.Maybe someconfusion overGMP amounts.Most of the keyinformationprovided, includingtable listingpermitted levelsfrom the AustralianFSANZ standards.Maybe some errorsin citation of therelevant standards,or confusion overschedules or GMPamounts.Large amounts ofmissinginformation.Does not providethe requiredinformation on theAustralian FSANZFood StandardsCode,Information sourcedfrom NonAustralian codes eg.USA, Europe. 11 CriteriaHigh DistinctionDistinctionCreditPassUnsatisfactory7. Tox assess &ADI(20%)Excellent, succinctand accuratedescription oftoxicological studiesrelevant to the foodadditive; therelationshipbetween thesestudies on human& animal effects,acute and chroniceffects.Accurate, specificand purposefulscientificinterpretation ofthe findings.Very well writtendescription oftoxicological studiesrelevant to the foodadditive; therelationshipbetween thesestudies on human& animal effects,acute and chroniceffects.Appropriatescientific facts andconcepts thatdescribe andexplain the findings.Good description oftoxicological studiesrelevant to the foodadditive; therelationshipbetween thesestudies on human& animal effects,acute and chroniceffectsThe information isusually accurateand purposeful.Basic description oftoxicological studiesrelevant to the foodadditive.You providescientific facts andconcepts thatsimply describe andexplain the findings.The informationprovided issometimesincomplete, orgeneral.Poor or inadequatedescription oftoxicological studiesand ADIYou provideinsuffcientscientific facts andconcepts todescribe andexplain the findingsThe informationprovided may bevague, inaccurateor irrelevant.8. TMDIcalculation(10%)TMDI calculationcorrectNo errors, allsupportinginformationprovided inwell-structuredtable,Shows good userecommended textsand high qualityreferences.TMDI calculationcorrectNo errors incalculation, allsupportinginformationprovided.Good use ofrecommended texts.TMDI calculationalmost correctA few errors, eg:ABS data,permitted levels, foradditive fordifferent foods, ormissing foods, orsome calculationerrors.TMDI calculationOK, but containserrors impacting onresult.Eg: errors inselecting ABS data,errors in permittedlevels, for additivefor different foods,or missing foods, orsome calculationerrors.Large amounts ofmissinginformation, or noconcept of how tocalculate TMDIErrors intransposing ABSdata tospread-sheet,incorrect permittedlevels, Largecalculation errors.9. EDI calculation(10%)EDI calculationcorrectNo errors, allsupportinginformationprovided inwell-structuredtable,Shows good userecommended textsand high qualityreferences.EDI calculationcorrectNo errors incalculation, allsupportinginformationprovided.Good use ofrecommended texts.EDI calculationalmost correctA few errors, eg:vulnerable personspecs, diet design,permitted levels, foradditive fordifferent foods, orsome calculationerrors.EDI calculation OK,but contains errorsimpacting on result.Eg: vulnerableperson specs, dietdesign, permittedlevels, for additivefor different foods,or some calculationerrors.Large amounts ofmissinginformation, or noconcept of how tocalculate EDIDoes not specifyvulnerable person,no logic in dietdesign, incorrectpermitted levels,Large calculationerrors.10. Risk analysisand conclusion(20%)Excellent, succinctand accurate riskanalysis.Compares TMDI &EDI to ADI. Logicaland evidence basedreflection on theassumptionsunderpinning thecalculations, thetoxicological studiesand high riskconsumers.Excellent riskmanagementoptionsAccurate, specificand purposefulscientificinterpretation ofthe findings.Very well writtenrisk analysisCompares TMDI &EDI to ADI. Verygood reflection onassumptionsunderpinning thecalculations, thetoxicological studiesand the high riskconsumers. Verygood riskmanagementoptions.Appropriatescientific facts andconcepts thatdescribe andexplain the findings.Good risk analysisCompares TMDI &EDI to ADI.Reflection on theassumptionsunderpinning thecalculations, thetoxicological studiesand the high riskconsumers. Goodrisk managementoptions.The information isusually accurateand purposeful.Basic risk analysis.Compares TMDI &EDI to ADI. Somereflection on theassumptionsunderpinning thecalculations, thetoxicological studiesand the high riskconsumers. Basicrisk managementoptions.The informationprovided issometimesincomplete, orgeneral.Poor or inadequaterisk analysisMisinterprets TMDI& EDI. Does notreflect on theassumptionsunderpinning thecalculations, thetoxicologicalstudies, and thehigh riskconsumers.The informationprovided may bevague, inaccurateor irrelevant. 12 CriteriaHigh DistinctionDistinctionCreditPassUnsatisfactory11. References(5%)High qualityreferencesdemonstratingextensive reading.Novel but relevantsources. Cited intext correctly andperfectly listed atthe end of thereport usingHarvard style.Recommendedtexts plus additionalrelevant references.Cited in textcorrectly, andcorrectly listed atthe end of thereport usingHarvard style.Standard andrecommended texts.Cited in text, andcorrectly listed atthe end of thereport usingHarvard style.Standard texts.Cited in text andlisted at end usingHarvard style.Some minorcitation errors.Little or noevidence ofrecommended texts,or extensive use ofnon-refereed onlinesources.Major citationerrors, in text andin the listing at end. 132.4.3 Laboratory report: Chemical analysis of a food product; Individual report Weight:25%Type of Collaboration:IndividualDue:7 May 2021Submission:Turnitin – submitted as a single file by 11:59 PM on 7 May 2021. File title shouldinclude your SURNAME and PRODUCT CODE.Format:Written laboratory report on the chemical analysis and identification of an unknownfood product.Length:1,800 wordsCurriculum Mode:Report Each individual student will be provided with an “unknown” food sample for chemical analysis. The objective is toobtain an accurate compositional analysis of your unknown food and identify your food product from the range ofproducts with known compositions.The major emphasis will be on individual performance in the laboratory, whereby students will assume the responsibilityfor conducting their analytical tests. Students will be allocated two practicals to conduct the necessary analysis workbetween week 4 – 7, please consult your timetable for actual dates and times of your allocated practical sessions.Practicals A and B can be done any order.The lab safety and familiarisation induction will be conducted after the sensory workshop on week 3.For each practical, please wear your laboratory coat, face mask and enclosed shoes, bring a marker pen to labelyour glassware and bound notebook to record your results. Also bring a copy of the laboratory manual (providedon vUWS). Carefully read the methods in the lab manual and adequately plan what needs to be done to prior toattending the practicals. Arrive promptly on time at each practical to ensure that you can complete the tests in theavailable time.The following methods will be employed:1. Moisture by oven drying at 100oC (Practical A)2. Ash by furnace at 550oC (Practical A3. Fat by Ankom Fat extraction (Practical A & B for sample prep, then extaction)4. Sugar by HPLC (Practical B)5. Protein by Dumas Nitrogen Analyser (Practical B)6. Sodium by HPLC (Practical B)Students will be required to obtain analytical results which are both reproducible and accurate. Follow the methodinstructions carefully. Keep the lid on the sample jar to avoid moisture uptake. Record all your results in clearlylabelled well-formated tables in a bound notebook. When weighing out samples, use the analytical balance and recordthe weight to 4 decimal places. Calculate mean and the standard deviation to determine reproducibility.If the replicates of your results substantially differ, do not calculate the mean of wildly different replicates. The assayshould be repeated until the results are reproducible and accurate. Please consult with the laboratory supervisor toplan when you can repeat any assays, if this is necessary.Exemplar:Laboratory report on the identification of an unknown food product (sample code)141) Introduction (30%)The introduction should state the problem and outline the method for tackling the problem; it should also include thebackground on the issues relevant to the methods used. Your introduction should state the objective of identifyingyour unknown and the methods used to analyse your unknown product.Provide a brief review literature on the methods you actually employed for analysis in the practicals for moisture,fat, protein, sugar, ash and sodium. Describe the chemical principles of each method used, the limitations of eachmethod.The background information is introduced in this section of the report so that you can refer to these findings in yourdiscussion, thus provide greater depth to your report. Use a range of reference sources to compare and contrast issuesabout the methods used as reported by the different authors. Cite references using Harvard referencing guide (Authorand Author, Year). Use reliable sources of information, including books and journals.NB: Do not review all the different options for methods, only the methods you actually used. You will use thisinformation in the discussion to reflect on how the method worked, what were the likely sources of errors, andimpacts on the precision and accuracy of the results.2) Method (5%)Provide a ’proper citation for the laboratory notes for the methods used in the experiment. Provide your sample ID,so your sample can be confirmed and identity verified.Describe all deviations from the provided method; eg. amounts, temperature, equipment changes, whatever is relevantto your particular experiment. E.g. indicate if you left the lid off the sample jar at any time (thus risk of moistureuptake), or other factors impacting the performance of the individual tests.Do not rewrite or summarise the methods, as the citation of the methods used provides suffcient detail to describewhat you have done. Only the changes need to be explained in suffcient detail that anyone could repeat exactlywhat you did to achieve the same results.3) Results (30%)The appendix should include the raw data for moisture, ash, protein, fat, sugar and sodium, plus starch and energycalculations. Include tare weights, sample weights, titres, HPLC traces, recorded on Excel spreadsheets with calculatedresults to 4 decimal places. The provision of raw data supports the quality and validity of your results and also allowsus to check the data and suggest corrections if errors occur.Main body of report should comprise 2 tables:TABLE 1 should comprise a summary of the average moisture, ash, protein, fat, sugar and sodium for your sample.Also report standard deviation (n=3 or 2). The matched sample composition should be included in this table forcomparison. Ensure the results are rounded off to 2 decimal places. The units should be in g/100g or mg/100g forsodium.TABLE 2 should comprise a Nutrition Information Panel based on your composition results, include starch by differenceand calculate energy kJ/100g. Assume 25g serving size. Comply precisely with FSANZ FSC 1.2.8 format for thelayout of the nutrition information panel.Layout of Tables – Arrange your results into neat tables, with lines ruled at top and bottom. Always give the unitsof measurement of each column of data eg. g/100g, oC, etc. (use correct SI units). Give the table a comprehensiveinformative title and number. Put the title ABOVE the table.Layout of Figures – Occasionally the results are best expressed in a graph, especially if you are tracking a trend overtime (line graph) or difference between treatments (bar charts or spider chart). Always include a key so the graphcan be easily interpreted. The graphs should have the axis appropriately labelled, with the units of measurement (usecorrect SI units, eg. oC not oF). Figures also include diagrams, photos, flow process charts, etc. Give each figure acomprehensive informative title and number, BELOW the figure154) Discussion (25%)The purpose of the discussion is to interpret the results, to relate your findings with literature and then make somesort of logical conclusion. Start at the beginning of the experiment and methodically discuss each set of results,discussing each in turn. You must refer to each table of data or figure, eg. “the results on Table 1 shows…”describe your observations and note important sources of error, using literature to support your findings. Ensure yourdiscussion follows a logical progression through the experiments that were done, guiding the reader through yourfindings towards your conclusions.Discuss each of your results in turn; (moisture, ash, protein, fat, sugar and sodium) and compare to the single productthat provides the best match overall (cited in Table 1). Do not compare to multiple reference products, just decideon which is the best overall match. Discuss the relative accuracy of each method and discuss any likely sources oferror, whereby some methods may provide a closer match to the reference sample, while others do not.Provide references to relevant literature (cite using Harvard Style). Reflect on the quality of your results and laboratoryperformance to provide insight to factors affecting the accuracy and precision of your results. What are the majordeterminants for obtaining reliable and accurate analytical results for each method?Discuss the Nutrition Information Panel (Table 2). Discuss the carbohydrate and energy calculations, reflect on thesources of error in the calculations. Discuss how is the NIP used by the consumer, reflecting on the accuracy of thedata.5) Conclusion (5%)Identify which is your closest match to your unknown sample, and summarise the key results on which you basethe identification of the unknown sample. Demonstrate that you understood the methods used and factors affectingaccuracy and precision of the results.6) References (5%)Information sourced from all references to be cited in-text, and correctly listed at the end of the report using Harvardstyle referencing, (the list is not included in word count).It is recommended you start with the recommended texts (as suggested in the lecture notes and LG resources) andthen search for additional texts and recent journals on methods for food analysis to provide additional depth andquality of information to support your report.7) Appendix (mark is included with Results section)The appendix should include the raw data for moisture, ash, protein, fat, sugar and sodium, plus starch and energycalculations. The Appendix should include all the recorded weights and measures you took during the analysis, panweights, titration titres, the HPLC traces, etc.Perform your calculations in Excel and place the tables/spreadsheets into the Appendix. Do not insert calculationsdone in long-hand form. Just report the key raw data and calculated replicates in spreadsheets. Calculate eachreplicate separately and then average the end results. Do not average raw data (eg pan weights etc), such actionwould produce erroneous results.If the replicates vary widely, don’t report an average. Use the Q-test to identify and reject anomalous data . If thereplicates are too different, it is recommended to repeat the test. If too late report both data points, and recommendthat in future the test be repeated.The Appendix will be marked as a part of the Results section, please format the tables in the Appendix to enablethe reader to navigate the information easily. You should refer to these tables in the Appendix when discussing yourresults.16Resources:– Lectures on weeks 5, 6, 7, 8 on food analysis methodology and data management– Lab safety induction and laboratory familiarisation induction on week 3 workshop– Practical sessions A and B. Attendance at your scheduled practical sessions is essential for completion of the necessary chemical analysis work needed to produce this report.– Practical notes on methodology and suggested background readings.Recommended Texts:Campbell-Platt, G. 2009, Food Science and Technology. IUFoST, Wiley-Blackwell. U.K.Neilsen, S.S, 2017, Food Analysis. Chapman & Hall, Maryland.Nollett, L.M.L, Toldra, F. 2015. Handbook of Food Analysis, 3rd Ed. CRC Press / Taylor & Francis Group. BocaRaton.Greenfield, H., Southgate, D.A.T. 2003. Food Composition Data – production management and use. Elsevier. London. Available at: http://www.fao.org/docrep/008/y4705e/Y4705E00.htm#ContentsHorwitz, W. Albert, R. Deutsch, M.J. Thompson, J.N. 1990. Precision parameters of methods of analysis requiredfor nutrition labelling. I. Major nutrients. Journal of the AOAC. 73 (5) 661-680.17Marking Criteria: CriteriaHigh DistinctionDistinctionCreditPassUnsatisfactory1. Introduction(30%)Excellent review ofall required topics,shows criticalthinking andinsights to thebackground of theexperiment.Extensive use ofrecommended plusadditional highquality references.Well written,comprehensivereview covering allthe required topics.Good use of widerange ofrecommended texts.Good review ofrequired topics.Covering the keypoints.Good use ofrecommended texts.Basically coversrequired topics.The informationprovided issometimesincomplete or toogeneral.Use ofrecommended texts.Does not addressthe required topics.Little or noevidence ofrecommended texts;relies primarily onnon-reviewedinternet sources.2. Method(5%)Reference topractical notes.Comprehensive listof all variationsfrom statedmethod, eg.amounts, times,temps. Correctreferencing andunits.Reference topractical notes.Identify and listalmost all variationsfrom statedmethod, eg.amounts, times,temps. Correctreferencing andunits.Reference topractical notes.Identify and listmost variationsfrom the statedmethod.Correct referencingand units.Reference topractical notes.Little or noindication ofvariations topublished method.Inserted or copiedmethod frompractical notes.Missing or vaguereference topractical notes.3. Results(30%)As for DistinctionplusAnalyticalmeasurementsaccurate andprecise.Carefully formattedtables for effcientinterpretation ofresults.Correctidentification ofunknown.As for Credit plusAll calculationscorrectComprehensivedescriptions fortitles of tables andfigures.Correctidentification ofunknown.Complete set ofresults.Summary Table ofresults showingyour sample andbest match.Appendix showingraw data &calculations formoisture, ash, fat,protein, sugar,sodium, starch andenergy.NutritionInformation PanelCalculations &format mostlycorrectUnits correct, figsrounded-off to 2decimal places.Titles of tablesmaybe brief, ormissing keyinformation.Almost completeset of results: data& calcs formoisture, ash, fat,protein, sugar,sodium, starch andenergy.Some errors incalculations,formatting oftables, units ofmeasure notprovided labelling oftables and figures.Incomplete results.Tables and figureshard to follow andnot adequatelylabelled.4. Discussion(25%)As for DistinctionplusDiscussioninsightful, logicaland succinctlydeveloped;describing keyfindings andexplaining theresults in context ofcurrent literature.You provideaccurate, specificand purposefulscientificinterpretation of thefindings. Conceptsare extended toexplain the findingsthoroughly.As for Credit plusDiscussionsuccinctly andaccuratelyinterpretsobservations, in thecontext of similarfindings inliterature. Youprovide detailedappropriatescientific facts andconcepts thatclearly describe andexplain the findings.Description ofresults in logicalorder, appropriatelyciting of each tableand figure.Discussioninterpretsobservations andrelates findings toliterature. Anyerrors in results areidentified, withpossible explanationfor causes.You providescientific facts andconcepts thatadequately describeand explain thefindings. Theinformation isusually accurateand purposeful.Description ofresults in logicalorder.You providescientific facts andconcepts thatsimply describe andexplain the findings.The informationprovided issometimesincomplete, orgeneral.Poor or inadequatedescription of theresults.You provideinsuffcientscientific facts andconcepts todescribe andexplain the findingsThe informationprovided may bevague, inaccurateor irrelevant. 18 CriteriaHigh DistinctionDistinctionCreditPassUnsatisfactory5. Conclusion(5%)Excellent summaryof the findings ofthe experiment,showing insightfuland perceptiveunderstanding ofexperiment.Well writtensummary of thefindings of theexperiment,showing insightfuland perceptiveunderstanding ofexperiment.Good summary ofthe key findings ofthe experiment.Concise and clearlywritten.Demonstratedunderstanding ofexperiment.Basic summary ofthe key findings asthey relate to theobjectives of theexperiment.MissingorConcludingstatementmisinterprets keyfinding of theexperiment.6. References(5%)High qualityreferencesdemonstratingextensive reading.Novel but relevantsources.Cited in textcorrectly andperfectly listed atthe end of thereport usingHarvard style.Recommendedtexts plus additionalrelevant references.Cited in textcorrectly, andcorrectly listed atthe end of thereport usingHarvard style.Standard andrecommended texts.Cited in text, andcorrectly listed atthe end of thereport usingHarvard style.Standard texts.Cited in text andlisted at end usingHarvard style.Some minorcitation errors.Little or noevidence ofrecommended texts,or extensive use ofnon-refereed onlinesources.Major citationerrors, in text andin the listing at end. 192.4.4 Quality Manual: Application of a quality standard (eg. ISO22000) to a food process; ProfessionalDocument Weight:25%Type of Collaboration:GroupDue:8 June 2021Submission:Turnitin – One copy of the group assignment submitted as a single file by 11:59 PM on8 June 2021. File title should include your PRODUCT NAME.Format:Mini Quality Manual of selected food product formatted to address ISO 22000 FoodSafety Management Systems standard.Length:7,500 (1,500 per student)Curriculum Mode:Professional Task This report is aimed at supporting students towards developing a working knowledge of ISO 22000 Food SafetyManagement Systems through the creation of a mini Quality Manual for a fictitious food manufacturer. The taskbuilds on knowledge of HACCP and food regulations, within the framework of quality management systems. Thistype of document is core to Quality Management systems in Australia, and will provide students with first handknowledge of their construction and application in food safety management.This is a group assignment with teams comprising 5-6 students. The report will be marked as a team effort, notindividually. This is a group activity whereby the result will reflect overall performance of the team, ability tocollaborate and cooperate. There are many content intersections throughout the report and a well-functioning teamwill assure internal consistency throughout the Quality Manual.The weekly Quality Manual workshops will introduce students to the form and content required in each section of theQuality Manual. The workshops are held in the IT labs to allow you to actively work with your group, ask questionsand be supported as you progress though the different activities for this report. Attendance at the Quality Manualworkshops will be monitored, as it is essential for group members have suffcient time to collaborate and cooperate.A factory tour is planned for week 12. This tour is aimed at providing real-world insights into maintaining a FoodSafety Management Systems and associated quality management procedures. Use this opportunity to ask questionsof the food manufacturers about their food safety management systems.Selection of appropriate food productEach group will select a different product; fresh or processed fruit and vegetables, meat, fish, eggs or dairy. E.g. Freshcut fruits or vegetables; fresh or marinated meat products; high-acid or low-acid aseptic processed foods (canned orretort pack); frozen, cook-chill, fermented, dehydrated, infant foods, cereal products (eg. pasta, bread, cakes etc. inall forms); meals and desserts.Food product options excludes the foods assessed in the Food Science 2 HACCP report, ie: Canned (apricots, beetrootcorn, peaches, peas, pineapple, salmon, tuna, tomatoes); Frozen (beans, blueberries, brussel sprouts, corn, onions,potatoes, peas, raspberries, spinach); Dehydrated (apricots, apples, bananas, prunes, milk); Pickled (cucumber, onion,cabbage, peppers); Pasteurised (fruit juice, milk or cream); Shelf stable (fruit juice, milk or cream) and yoghurt.Delegation workplanSubmit delegation work plan to confirm a fair work balance between the team members, this should be plannedduring your first QM workshop.20Strategy to do this reportCollect relevant literature and information about the process for the selected food product, raw material and endproduct specifications and key process conditions for the manufacture of the product (e.g. heat process temperatureand times, pH, or chilling temperature). Review a wide range of credible scientific literature to define your processand validate the selected control measures to assure a safe food product. Cite references in-text and listed in theappropriate sections of the Quality Manual.Design the process for your product including necessary raw materials. Produce a Flow Process Chart and checkwhether these operations will likely produce a safe food product. Submit this Flow chart for feedback on processdesign and key process conditions necessary to produce a safe food product.Assemble all the standards as necessary to assure the process addresses regulatory requirements, including FSANZFood Standards Code, ISO 22000 and other ISO Standards, plus relevant Codex standards and guidelines. Provide areference list of standards and ’codes of practice’ used in the preparation of Quality Manual, this demonstrates thatyou are aware of the standards in the area and how they are interrelated.Report detailsThe Quality Manual needs to address each section of the ISO 22000 Food Safety Management Standard, with specialattention to the HACCP plan for the selected product.As this is an imaginary product made by an imaginary company, you can use creative license in the backgrounddescribing some detail of your organisational structure.The criteria for each section of the Quality Manual will be discussed in class, along with provided notes specifyingthe desired content for each section on vUWS.The Quality Manual needs to be compiled with a formal layout and a methodical structure closely following thestandard: ISO 22000:2018. Provide a table of contents, include all major sections and sub-sections of the standard(Sections 4-10). Use the same numbering system to allow the reader to cross check the standard with your document.The page numbers of each section of the manual needs to be separately numbered, using a format to allow easynavigation, eg. Section 5, page 4 of 6. This format allows the different sections of the Quality Manual to be updatedas necessary, underpinning one of the quality management principles of ’continuous improvement’. The header ofeach page needs documentation control information (i.e. company name, date, revision number, sign-off).Provide the cross reference notes between the various clauses as identified in the standard to demonstrate the requiredlinkages between sections. Maintain consistency throughout the document in terms of your company structure,facilities, resources, product, process and HACCP plan; demonstrating that your group have worked well togetherthroughout the preparation of your entire document.The quality manual will be marked out of 140 marks, and is worth 25% of total unit assessment. Further breakdownof the criteria and marks for the different sections will be discussed during class and uploaded to vUWS during thesemester.Resources:Find journals and books on your particular food process, including scientific references supporting the selection ofcritical control points required to ensure the safety of your food during processing and packaging.ISO Standards:– ISO 22000:2018 Food safety management systems – Requirements for any organization in the food chain– AS ISO 22000-2005 Food safety management systems – Requirements for any organization in the food chain– AS/NZS ISO 9001:2016 Quality management systems – Requirements– ISO 9001:2015 Quality management systems – Requirements– ISO/TS 22002-1:2009 Prerequisite programmes on food safety – Part 1: Food manufacturing (ISO 22002 seriesalso includes PRP standards for catering, farming, food packaging, transport & storage, animal feed).21– ISO/TS 22003:2013 Food safety management systems – Requirements for bodies providing audit and certificationof food safety management systems.– AS NZS ISO 45001:2018 Requirements with guidance for use Occupational health and safety management systems– Requirements with guidance for use.– AS NZS ISO 14001:2016 Environmental management systems – Requirements with guidance for use.Texts– Hoyle, D 2018, ISO 9000 quality systems handbook: using the standards as a framework for business improvement,7th edn, Abingdon, Oxon ( https://www-taylorfrancis-com.ezproxy.uws.edu.au/books/9781315642192 )– Surak J. G. Wilson S. (eds). 2014. Certified HACCP Auditor Handbook (3rd Edition) ASQ Quality Press. Milwaukee, Wisconsin.– Newslow, DL 2014, Food safety management programs: applications, best practice and compliance, CRC Press,Boca Raton.– Mortimore , S, Wallace, C. 2013. HACCP a practical approach 3rd ed. Springer New York.Standards– FSANZ, 2020. Food standards code. CHAPTER 1 – Part 1.6 Microbiological and Processing Requirements;CHAPTER 2 – Food Product Standards; CHAPTER 3 – Food safety Standards; CHAPTER 4 – Primary Production Standards. https://www.foodstandards.gov.au/ code/Pages/default.aspx – FSANZ 2014. Food Industry Recall Protocol – information on recalling food in Australia and writing a food recall plan, 7th edition.https://www.foodstandards.gov.au/publications/Documents/FSANZFoodRecallProtocol2014.pdf.– CODEX 2020. General Principles of Food Hygiene. CXC 1-1969 Adopted in 1969. Amended in 1999. Revised in1997, 2003, 2020.– CODEX Alimentarius International Food Standards. – Please view the Codex Standards, Guidelines and Codes ofPractice as relevant to your product. http://www.fao.org/fao-who-codexalimentarius/en/NSW Food Authority– General Guidelines for the Development and Implementation of a Food Safety Program https://www.foodauthority.nsw.gov.au/sites/default/files/_Documents/industry/guide_to_develop_food_safety_program.pdf– Guidance on Audits https://www.foodauthority.nsw.gov.au/sites/default/files/_Documents/industry/guidance_on_audits.pdf– Cleaning and sanitising in retail food businesses https://www.foodauthority.nsw.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-07/cleaning_sanitising_food_businesses.pdf– Recalls, https://www.foodauthority.nsw.gov.au/help/recalls– Calibration of thermometers in varied altitudes https://www.foodauthority.nsw.gov.au/sites/default/files/_Documents/industry/calibration_of_thermometers_in_varied_altitudes.pdf– NSW retail meat food safety program, https://www.foodauthority.nsw.gov.au/sites/default/files/_Documents/industry/retail_meat_food_safety_program.pdf22Marking Criteria: CriteriaHigh DistinctionDistinctionCreditPassUnsatisfactoryPresentation andlayout(10/140 marks)Excellentcomprehensivereport showing highattention to detail.As for credit plus,well-constructed,comprehensivereport.All sections of thereport are present& formatted as perreport outline.Most sections ofthe report arepresent as perreport outline.Poor constructionof report.Incomplete or doesnot address therequired topics.Section 4(10/140 marks)Excellent,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Explanations andexamples showcritical thinking andinsights aboutbackground of theprocess and foodsafety management.Excellent scope offood safetymanagementsystem.Well written,comprehensivelyaddresses allrequired topics.Provision of verygoodevidence-basedexamples. Verygood scope of foodsafety managementsystem.Good, addressesrequired topics.Provision ofdetailed examplesand information.Clear scope of foodsafety managementsystem.Basically addressesrequired topics withbasic examples.The informationprovided issometimesincomplete or toogeneral. Basicscope of food safetymanagementsystem.Incomplete or doesnot address therequired topics.Poorly written.Section 5(20/140 marks)Excellent,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Explanations andexamples showcritical thinking andinsights aboutbackground of theprocess and foodsafety management.Excellent use ofrelevant literatureto define theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Well written,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Provision of verygoodevidence-basedexamples. Verygood use ofrelevant literatureto define theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Good, addressesrequired topics.Provision ofdetailed examplesand information.Good use ofrelevant literatureto define theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Basically addressesrequired topics withbasic examples.The informationprovided issometimesincomplete or toogeneral.Incomplete or doesnot address therequired topics.Poorly written.Section 6(10/140 marks)Excellent,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Explanations andexamples showcritical thinking andinsights aboutbackground of theprocess and foodsafety management.Excellent use ofrelevant literatureto define theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Well written,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Provision of verygoodevidence-basedexamples. Verygood use ofrelevant literatureto define theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Good, addressesrequired topics.Provision ofdetailed examplesand information.Good use ofrelevant literatureto define theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Basically addressesrequired topics withbasic examples.The informationprovided issometimesincomplete or toogeneral.Incomplete or doesnot address therequired topics.Poorly written.Section 7(20/140 marks)Excellent,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Explanations andexamples showcritical thinking andinsights onbackground of theprocess and foodsafety management.Excellent use ofrelevant literatureto define theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Well written,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Provision of verygoodevidence-basedexamples. Verygood use ofrelevant literatureto define theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Good, addressesrequired topics.Provision ofdetailed examplesand information.Good use ofrelevant literatureto define theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Basically addressesrequired topics withbasic examples.The informationprovided issometimesincomplete or toogeneral.Incomplete or doesnot address therequired topics.Poorly written. 23 CriteriaHigh DistinctionDistinctionCreditPassUnsatisfactorySection 8(60/140 marks)Excellent,comprehensivelyaddresses thestandard. Provisionof excellentevidence-basedexamples.Explanations showcritical thinking andinsights to thebackground of theprocess and foodsafety management.ComprehensiveHazard Assessmentand controlmeasures. Accurateidentification of allCCPs. ExcellentHACCP AuditTable. Accuratecritical limits;monitoringactivities; andcorrective actions insuffcient details toprovide clearguidance for foodsafety managementof a food process.Well written,comprehensivelyaddresses thestandards.Provision of verygoodevidence-basedexamples.Explanationsdemonstrate criticalthinking and someinsight. Very goodHazard Assessmentand controlmeasures withevidence-basedexamples. Virtuallyall CCPs correctlyidentified. Verygood HACCP AuditTable. Appropriatecritical limits;monitoringactivities; andcorrective actions insuffcient details toprovide clearguidance for foodsafety managementof a food process.Good, addressesrequired topics.Provision ofdetailed examplesand information.Minimal errors inprocess steps or inthe HazardAssessment. CCPSmostly correct.Good HACCP AuditTable with goodexamples of criticallimits; monitoringactivities; andcorrective actions.Minimal errors andprovision ofsuffcient detailrequired to specifya safe food process.Basically addressesrequired topics withbasic examples.Maybe some errorsin process steps orin the Hazardassessment. Maybesome confusion inidentification ofCCPS. Minor errorsHACCP AuditTable. Maybe someconfusion in CCPScritical limits andcorrective actionsfor the differentCCPs assessed.Incomplete or doesnot address therequired topics.Poorly written.Incomplete HazardAssessmentWorksheet Poorlywritten. Inaccurateprocess, missingsteps &/or missingingredients. Likelyto produce unsafeproduct. Poorlywritten HAW,inaccurate CCPs.Poorly writtenHACCP AuditTable; Incorrect orinappropriate CCPscritical limits andcorrective actions.Likely to produceunsafe product.Section 9(10/140 marks)Excellent,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Explanations andexamples showcritical thinking andinsights onbackground of theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Well written,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Provision of verygoodevidence-basedexamples. Showsinsight onbackground of theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Good, addressesrequired topics.Provision ofdetailed examplesand informationspecifying the foodsafety managementsystem.Basically addressesrequired topics withbasic examples.The informationprovided issometimesincomplete or toogeneral.Incomplete or doesnot address therequired topics.Poorly writtenSection 10(10/140 marks)Excellent,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Explanations andexamples showcritical thinking andinsights onbackground of theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Well written,comprehensivelyaddresses standard.Provision of verygoodevidence-basedexamples. Showsinsight onbackground of theprocess and foodsafety managementsystem.Good, addressesrequired topics.Provision ofdetailed examplesand informationspecifying the foodsafety managementsystem.Basically addressesrequired topics withbasic examples.The informationprovided issometimesincomplete or toogeneral.Incomplete or doesnot address therequired topics.Poorly writtenReferences(10/140 marks)High qualityreferencesdemonstratingextensive reading.Novel but relevantsources. Cited intext correctly andperfectly listed atthe end of thereport usingHarvard styleRecommendedtexts plusadditional relevantreferences. Cited intext correctly, andcorrectly listed atthe end of thereport usingHarvard styleStandard andrecommended texts.Cited in text, andcorrectly listed atthe end of thereport usingHarvard styleStandard texts.Cited in text andlisted at end usingHarvard style.Some minorcitation errorsLittle or noevidence ofrecommended texts,or extensive use ofnon-refereed onlinesources. Majorcitation errors, intext and in thelisting at end. 242.5 General Submission RequirementsSubmission– All assignments must be submitted by the specified due date and time.– Complete your assignment and follow the individual assessment item instructions on how to submit. You mustkeep a copy of all assignments submitted for marking.Turnitin– The Turnitin plagiarism prevention system may be used within this Unit. Turnitin is accessed via logging intovUWS for the Unit. If Turnitin is being used with this Unit, this means that your assignments have to besubmitted through the Turnitin system. Turnitin from iParadigms is a web-based text-matching software thatidentifies and reports on similarities between documents. It is also widely utilised as a tool to improve academicwriting skills. Turnitin compares electronically submitted papers against the following:– Current and archived web: Turnitin currently contains over 24 billion web pages including archived pages– Student papers: including Western Sydney University student submissions since 2007– Scholarly literature: Turnitin has partnered with leading content publishers, including library databases,text-book publishers, digital reference collections and subscription-based publications (e.g. Gale, Proquest, Emerald and Sage)– Turnitin is used by over 30 universities in Australia and is increasingly seen as an industry standard. It isan important tool to assist students with their academic writing by promoting awareness of plagiarism.Bysubmitting your assignment to Turnitin you will be certifying that:– I hold a copy of this assignment if the original is lost or damaged– No part of this assignment has been copied from any other student’s work or from any other source exceptwhere due acknowledgement is made in the assignment– No part of the assignment has been written for me by any other person/s– I have complied with the specified word length for this assignment– I am aware that this work may be reproduced and submitted to plagiarism detection software programs forthe purpose of detecting possible plagiarism (which may retain a copy on its database for future plagiarismchecking).Self-Plagiarising– You are to ensure that no part of any submitted assignment for this Unit or product has been submitted byyourself in another (previous or current) assessment from any Unit, except where appropriately referenced, andwith prior permission from the Lecturer/Tutor/Unit Coordinator of this Unit.Late Submission– If you submit a late assessment, without receiving approval for an extension of time, (see next item), you willbe penalised by 10% per day for up to 10 days. In other words, marks equal to 10% of the assignment’s weightwill be deducted from the mark awarded.– For example, if the highest mark possible is 50, 5 marks will be deducted from your awarded mark for each lateday.– Saturday and Sunday are counted as one calendar day each.– Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment task has been returned to students.– This is consistent with Western Sydney University’s Assessment Policy25Extension of Due Date for SubmissionExtensions are only granted in exceptional circumstances. To apply for an extension of time, locate an applicationform via the Western Sydney University homepage or copy the following link:https://www.westernsydney.edu.au/currentstudents/current_students/formsApplication forms must be submitted to the Unit Coordinator/Convenor. Requests for extension should be made asearly as possible and submitted within policy deadlines. Appropriate, supporting documentation must be submittedwith the application. An application for an extension does not automatically mean that an extension will be granted.Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment task has been returned to students.ResubmissionResubmission of assessment items will not normally be granted if requested.Application for Special ConsiderationIt is strongly recommended that you attend all scheduled learning activities to support your learning. If you havesuffered misadventure, illness, or you have experienced exceptional circumstances that have prevented your attendanceat class or your completion and submission of assessment tasks, you may need to apply for Special Consideration via theWestern Sydney University website. http://www.westernsydney.edu.au/currentstudents/current_students/services_and_facilities/special_consideration2 or the Student Centre/Sydney City Campus Reception. Special Considerationis not automatically granted. It is your responsibility to ensure that any missed content has been covered. Yourlecturer will give you more information on how this must be done.263 Teaching and Learning Activities WeeksLectureWorkshopAssessments DueWeek 101-03-2021Introduction, Food RegulationsFood Toxicology 1nilWeek 208-03-2021The senses and food evaluationFood Toxicology 2Food additive workshop – ZoomWeek 315-03-2021Sensory Methods and StatisticsRisk analysisSensory workshop – M10 kitchenLab induction – M10 LabWeek 422-03-2021Objective food assessment methodsRisk managementFood Analysis Practicals – M10 Lab– Online and in-class quizzes:Multiple choice and short answer,each quiz worth 5%Week 529-03-2021Food analysis introductionWater analysis methodsFood Analysis Practicals – M10 LabWeek 605-04-2021Management of results dataLabelling regulationsLecture to be pre-recorded due toEaster Monday – follow-upquestions during week 8 workshop.Food Analysis Practicals – M10 Lab– Online and in-class quizzes:Multiple choice and short answer,each quiz worth 5%Week 712-04-2021Fat analysis methodsProtein methodsFood Analysis Practicals – M10 Lab– Food additive risk assessment:Research task;Individual reportWeek 819-04-2021Carbohydrate analysis methodsMineral and vitamin analysisLabelling workshop – M10 LabLab report Q&A– Online and in-class quizzes:Multiple choice and short answer,each quiz worth 5%Week 926-04-2021Week 1003-05-2021Total Quality ManagementQuality Manual IntroductionQuality Manual wkshp 1 – Zoom– Laboratory report: Chemicalanalysis of a food product;Individual reportWeek 1110-05-2021TQM six sigmaQuality Manual wkshp 2 – ZoomWeek 1217-05-2021Documentation, Ingredient suppliersFood safety auditing1/2 day factory tour– Online and in-class quizzes:Multiple choice and short answer,each quiz worth 5%Week 1324-05-2021TQM statistical toolsQuality Manual wkshp 3 – ZoomWeek 1431-05-2021TQM statistical tools tutorialQuality Manual wkshp 4 – Zoom– Online and in-class quizzes:Multiple choice and short answer,each quiz worth 5% 27 WeeksLectureWorkshopAssessments DueWeek 1507-06-2021– Quality Manual: Application of aquality standard (eg. ISO22000) toa food process; ProfessionalDocumentWeek 1614-06-2021Week 1721-06-2021 The above timetable should be used as a guide only, as it is subject to change. Students will be advised of any changes as they becomeknown on the Unit’s vUWS site.284 Learning Resources4.1 Recommended ReadingsEssential ReadingAlli, I. 2004, Food quality assurance: principles and practices, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fla. [e-book]Campbell-Platt, G. 2009, Food Science and Technology. IUFoST, Wiley-Blackwell. U.K. [e-book]Deshpande, SS. 2002, Handbook of food toxicology, Marcel Dekker, New York. [e-book]Nielsen, SS. 2014, Food Analysis, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, Boston, MA. [e-book]Vasconcellos, JA. 2004, Quality assurance for the food industry: a practical approach, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fla.[e-book]Additional ReadingClute, M 2009, Food industry: quality control systems, Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, Fla.Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) 2007 Guide to the Food Safety Standards. Available from:http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/code/userguide/Documents/Guide%20321%20FINAL.pdfFood Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) 2015, Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code. Availablefrom: http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/code/Pages/default.aspxGaze, R (ed.) 2009, HACCP: a practical guide, 4th edn, Campden BRI, Chipping Campden. Greenfield, H, and Southgate D.A.T. 2003.Food composition data – production, management anduse.Second edition.Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome.Available at:ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/008/y4705e/y4705e.pdfHoyle,D. 2009,ISO 9000 quality systems handbook:using the standards as a framework for business improvement,6th edition,Butterworth-Heinemann,Oxford.Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9781856176842Joint FAO / WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission 2009, Food hygiene: basic texts, 4th ed. World Health Organization, Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome.Joint FAO / WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission 2012, Codex Alimentarius: list of food standards. Available from:http://www.codexalimentarius.org/standardsJoint FAO / WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission 2012. The Joint FAO/WHO Committee on Food Additives,Available at: http://www.codexalimentarius.net/web/jecfa.jspKnechtges, PL 2012, Food safety: theory and practice, Jones & Bartlett Learning, Sudbury, MA.Lawley, R, Curtis, L & Davis, J 2012, The food safety hazard guidebook, 2nd edn, Royal Society of Chemistry,Cambridge.Meilgaard, M, Civille, GV & Carr, BT 2007, Sensory evaluation techniques, 4th edn, Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton,Fla.29Mortimore , S, Wallace, C (2013) HACCP a practical approach 3rd ed. Springer New York [online]Nollet, L.M.L, Toldra, F. (eds), 2015. Handbook of Food Analysis, 3rd Edition – Two Vol Set, CRC Press.Omaye, ST. 2004. Food and Nutritional Toxicology. CRC Press, Boca Raton.Rahman, SM. 2007. Handbook of Food Preservation, 2nd ed. Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton.Shibamoto, T & Bjeldanes, LF 2009, Introduction to food toxicology, 2nd edn, Elsevier. Amsterdam.Standards Australia Online 2005, Food safety management systems – Requirements for any organization in the foodchain, AS ISO 22000-2005. [SAI Global database in library]Surak J. G. Wilson S. (eds). 2014. Certified HACCP Auditor Handbook (3rd Edition) ASQ Quality Press. Milwaukee,Wisconsin.[online]Watson, DH. 2002. Food Chemical safety, Vol 2 Food Additives, 2nd Ed. Woodhead Pub. Cambridge, Eng.[online]30

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