direct link between an ethical life and happiness | My Assignment Tutor

by doing this to the best our ability we are “in accordance with virtue”. FToo General2The Goad Life: Is there a direct by doing this to the best our ability we are “in accordance with virtue”. FToo General2The Goad Life: Is there a direct link between an ethical life and happiness?Happiness, was once described by Aristotle as the “aim of our existence—. belteviiii-`good life’ to be the ultimate end to which all virtuous actions are directed. Philosophers hrouhout history have argued over the nature of happiness and the role of virtues andethics in achieving ‘the good life’. Some philosophers, such as Aristotle and the Stoics, believed that one could not be happy without leading an ethical and virtuous life. While others claimed that possessing virtue did not always result in happiness, with luck playing a significant role in human affairs, To Roman Stoic Cicero, however, the relationship between happiness and virtue was so powerful, that a man in possession of virtue couldstill be happy even while being tortured;. By using the Stoic definition of happiness along with Aristotle’s examination of the ‘good life’, this essay will defend the belief that an ethical life is a happy life. According to Dawkins, we are living in the midst of a “shifting moral Zeitgeist-4 in which happiness is measured according to material progress rather than moral gain. With the emergence of “status anxiety”5, ethics and virtues have been long forgotten in the quest for wealth and material objects and by comparing modern and archaic ideas of happiness, this essay will attempt to refute any direct link between wealth and happiness.Greek philosophers, such as Aristotle and the Stoics, argued that there was a consistent link between an ethical life and happiness, believing one could not be happy without exercising virtues. Aristotle once wrote that in order for one to lead the ‘good life’, one must participate in -activity of the soul in accordance with virtue”6. Our -activity of the soul”, he claims, refers to our unique function as human beings. He argues that our capacity to be rational and reflect upon our actions distinguishes us from other livingthings andorAristotle, happiness is a -“virtuous activity” that is achieved by leading a life of excellence. To achieve virtue and excellence, one must perform repeated acts in order for it to become ‘second nature’. Aristotle believes that one is not born with ethical virtues but rather are “engendered into us through practice”‘ where the more practice one has, the more likely one is to achieve excellence and therefore happiness. As Crisp explains,1 Jean-Philippe Deranty, Lecture on Aristotelian Ethics, Macquarie University, Lecture 4, March 2015. 2 Rosalind Hursthouse, Otr Virtue Elhics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999). 3 Raymond Angelo Belliotti, Roman Philosophy and the Good Life (UK: Lexington Books, 2009), p. 30. Richard Dawkins, The God Delusion (London: Transworld Publishers, 2006). 5 Alain De Batton, Stains Anxiely (Australia: Penguin Books, 2004). 6 Aristotle. ‘Ethical Virtue: Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics’ in John Cottingham (ed.) Western Philosophy: An Anthology, (Oxford: Blackwell, 1996), p. 492-495. / Roger Crisp, ‘Aristotle: Ethics and Politics’, in David Furley (ed.) Routledge History of Philosophy: (London: Routledge, 1999), p. 109-122, see p.119.2 ?Happiness, was once described by Aristotle as the “aim of our existence—. belteviiii-`good life’ to be the ultimate end to which all virtuous actions are directed. Philosophers hrouhout history have argued over the nature of happiness and the role of virtues andethics in achieving ‘the good life’. Some philosophers, such as Aristotle and the Stoics, believed that one could not be happy without leading an ethical and virtuous life. While others claimed that possessing virtue did not always result in happiness, with luck playing a significant role in human affairs, To Roman Stoic Cicero, however, the relationship between happiness and virtue was so powerful, that a man in possession of virtue couldstill be happy even while being tortured;. By using the Stoic definition of happiness along with Aristotle’s examination of the ‘good life’, this essay will defend the belief that an ethical life is a happy life. According to Dawkins, we are living in the midst of a “shifting moral Zeitgeist-4 in which happiness is measured according to material progress rather than moral gain. With the emergence of “status anxiety”5, ethics and virtues have been long forgotten in the quest for wealth and material objects and by comparing modern and archaic ideas of happiness, this essay will attempt to refute any direct link between wealth and happiness.Greek philosophers, such as Aristotle and the Stoics, argued that there was a consistent link between an ethical life and happiness, believing one could not be happy without exercising virtues. Aristotle once wrote that in order for one to lead the ‘good life’, one must participate in -activity of the soul in accordance with virtue”6. Our -activity of the soul”, he claims, refers to our unique function as human beings. He argues that our capacity to be rational and reflect upon our actions distinguishes us from other livingthings andorAristotle, happiness is a -“virtuous activity” that is achieved by leading a life of excellence. To achieve virtue and excellence, one must perform repeated acts in order for it to become ‘second nature’. Aristotle believes that one is not born with ethical virtues but rather are “engendered into us through practice”‘ where the more practice one has, the more likely one is to achieve excellence and therefore happiness. As Crisp explains,1 Jean-Philippe Deranty, Lecture on Aristotelian Ethics, Macquarie University, Lecture 4, March 2015. 2 Rosalind Hursthouse, Otr Virtue Elhics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999). 3 Raymond Angelo Belliotti, Roman Philosophy and the Good Life (UK: Lexington Books, 2009), p. 30. Richard Dawkins, The God Delusion (London: Transworld Publishers, 2006). 5 Alain De Batton, Stains Anxiely (Australia: Penguin Books, 2004). 6 Aristotle. ‘Ethical Virtue: Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics’ in John Cottingham (ed.) Western Philosophy: An Anthology, (Oxford: Blackwell, 1996), p. 492-495. / Roger Crisp, ‘Aristotle: Ethics and Politics’, in David Furley (ed.) Routledge History of Philosophy: (London: Routledge, 1999), p. 109-122, see p.119.2

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